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Parliament of Australia and People's Consultative Assembly of the Republic of Indonesia (MPR)

Parliament and MPR [PDF 2.97Mb, 18 pages]

MPR cover image

A comparison of the Australian and Indonesian national political systems.

The Australian and Indonesian systems of government are both based on freely elected representatives deliberating to make laws for the whole nation. Both national parliaments have two chambers: a lower house representing the interests of regional communities and an upper house representing states or territories.

However, there are also differences between the two systems. Australia is a constitutional monarchy and Indonesia is a republic. The differences between the two systems can be seen in their overall structure and in their heads of state.

The Indonesian parliament is the People’s Consultative Assembly (Majelis Permusyawaratan Rakyat – MPR). The MPR has two chambers: the People’s Representative Council (Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat – DPR) and the Regional Representative Council (Dewan Perwakilan Daerah – DPD). Although the Indonesian parliament has two chambers it is not strictly a bicameral parliament because the DPD does not have a role in the law-making process. The DPR has the final decision to pass, amend (change) or reject any bill.

MPR Chambers

Left: DPD (Dewan Perwakilan Daerah), Middle: DPR (Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat), Right: MPR (Majelis Permusyawaratan Rakya)

L to R: Courtesy of the Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia; courtesy of the Secretariat General of the People’s Representative Council of the Republic of Indonesia; courtesy of the Secretariat General of the People’s Representative Council of the Republic of Indonesia

The following sections compare and contrast key aspects of the Australian and Indonesian political systems.