Programs

Role-play choices

About four weeks before your program, we will send you a booking confirmation letter and role-play selection form.  

After your group checks in at Australia's Parliament House, a PEO educator will meet you and escort you to the role-play venue. This can be an opportunity for a quick discussion about specific program requests.

Debating a bill role-play

  Debating a bill in the House of RepresentativesDebating a bill in the SenateDebating a bill with amendments
Student roles Presiding officers, ministers, shadow ministers, government and opposition backbenchers, independents, members/senators of minor parties and parliamentary officers.
Process Government, opposition and minor party/independent members have an opportunity to express their view on the bill being debated. A vote on the bill will follow. In addition to debating a bill, students are introduced to the process of how the federal Parliament may change, or amend, a bill.
Learning outcomes Students will understand the concepts of legislation (law-making), representation, scrutiny and formation of government. The emphasis is on legislation.
Prior knowledge None Knowledge of the passage of a bill through the House of Representatives is useful, but not essential. Knowledge of the passage of a bill through the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Extension programs

  Question Time role-play (House of Representatives or Senate)Committee of Inquiry (House of Representatives or Senate)
Student roles Presiding officers, ministers, shadow ministers, government and opposition backbenchers, independents, members of minor parties and parliamentary officers.

Members of parliament and representatives of witness groups.

Process

Ministers are asked questions without notice from both sides of the chamber and are called on to answer these questions.

Involves improvisation and quick questions and answers.

In a House of Representatives inquiry, members question the witnesses to become better-informed about an issue. When the evidence has been heard, the committee makes recommendations concerning the issue.

In a Senate inquiry, senators question the witnesses to become better-informed about issues arising from a bill. The senators use the evidence gathered to recommend either that the bill be accepted, rejected or that appropriate changes be made.

Involves formulating questions, critical listening and synthesising information.
Learning outcomes Students will understand the role of executive government (the ministry), government accountability to the Parliament and the people of Australia, and opposition scrutiny. Students will understand the committee system, policy-making and how Australians are able to voice their views.
Suits

Students who have seen Question Time on television or will be sitting in on the real Question Time as part of their visit to Parliament House.

Suits resourceful students who are able to quickly improvise.

Smaller groups (20–25 students).

Suits resourceful students who are able to quickly improvise.
Prior knowledge Familiarity with the basic functions of Parliament. Some knowledge of current affairs is useful. Familiarity with the basic functions of Parliament.