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In case you missed it

New Member for Wentworth

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

Dr Kerryn Phelps AM was sworn in as the member representing the electorate of Wentworth in Sydney. Dr Phelps was elected to replace the Hon Malcolm Turnbull after he retired from the Parliament. In her first speech she described the diversity of her electorate—‘Wentworth has one of the largest Jewish communities in Australia: many families fleeing here from Europe around the time of the Second World War; others coming from Russia or South Africa. There are the surfers, the yachties, the young families, the retirees, the business men and women and a large gay community.’

Dr Phelps noted that the decisions made in Parliament affect the lives of Australians and listed health, aged care, education, small business, climate change, gender equality, recognition of First Nations people, and the humane treatment of asylum seekers as some of her priorities. In conclusion, the new Member for Wentworth spoke of her hopes for the future—‘I want our parliament to unite us as a nation in equality, justice and opportunity. To achieve that, I will focus on the human experience that is generated by political decisions; a vision for the future we will be leaving for our children and our grandchildren.’

Encryption bill

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

The ability of Australia’s law enforcement and security agencies to access encrypted communications will be strengthened under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018 will provide additional powers and time for law enforcement agencies, including Australian Border Force and the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, to access data held on electronic devices, such as computers and mobile phones.

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Attorney-General, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said, ‘Encryption is a vital part of the internet, computer and data security, supporting Australia's economic growth and national security. However, we would be naive to think that digital technologies which drive our economic prosperity are immune to exploitation.’

The bill was supported by the opposition but opposed by some crossbenchers in both chambers, including the Australian Greens and Centre Alliance.

Report on the right to discriminate

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

The Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs has tabled its report into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff. The report made a number of recommendations, including:

  • the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 be amended to prohibit discrimination against students on their the ground of their sexual orientation or gender identity
  • further consideration be given to changing the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 to ban discrimination by faith-based educational institutions against teachers and staff
  • consideration be given to making a law protecting religious freedom in Australia that is appropriately balanced with other rights.

Gaming or gambling?

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

The Senate Standing Committee on Environment and Communications has tabled its report into gaming micro-transactions for chance based items, known as loot boxes. The report acknowledged there are different kinds of loot boxes in video games and recommended that a comprehensive review should be undertaken by the Department of Communications and the Arts and related agencies. Senators from the Australian Greens made additional comments in the report noting that loot boxes may meet the psychological definition of gambling and cause harm, particularly to younger gamers.

The view from the crossbench

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

A number of private senators’ and members’ bills were introduced into the Parliament:

Senator suspended

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

Under Senate standing order 203, Australian Greens Senator Richard Di Natale was suspended from the meeting of the Senate for the rest of the day for using unparliamentary language. The standing orders—rules—of the Senate are different from those of the House of the Representatives, where standing order 94A allows the Speaker to instruct a member to leave the chamber for 1 hour. In the Senate, a vote is required to suspend a senator from the meeting. The rule was last used in March 2003 when Senator Bob Brown was suspended for the rest of the day.

In history

Sitting period 26 November to 6 December

On 23 December 1901 the new federal Parliament passed The Immigration Restriction Act 1901. The Act became the basis of the White Australia Policy, and influenced government policy regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as well as immigration for the next 70 years.

The federal Parliament passed The Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 on 9 December 1976. This law allowed Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory to claim land rights over country.

On 7 December 2017 the Parliament passed The Marriage Amendment (Definition and Religious Freedoms) Act 2017. The law redefined marriage as ‘a union of two people’ and allowed same-sex couples to be legally married in Australia.

The right to discriminate

Sitting period 11 to 15 November

The Senate will inquire into laws which allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students and teachers on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The committee conducting the inquiry is currently accepting submissions and is scheduled to report to the Parliament by 26 November.

Wage theft? What wage theft?!

Sitting period 11 to 15 November

The Senate Standing Committee on Education and Employment has presented the report of its investigation into the exploitation of cleaners working in retail chains, such as Woolworths. The committee has made a number of recommendations, including:

  • the Government take immediate steps to protect vulnerable workers
  • the Department of Finance make companies who have been penalised for wage theft more than once ineligible for government contracts
  • the Government establish a national labour hire licensing scheme
  • funding community legal centres to assist vulnerable workers.

Addressing inequality in Australia

Sitting period 11 to 15 November

The Senate passed a private senator’s bill to expand the role of the Productivity Commission to include research on how inequality affects the Australian community and economy. The Productivity Commission Amendment (Addressing Inequality) Bill 2017 was introduced by Australian Labor Party Senator Anne Urquhart on behalf of her colleague Senator Jenny McAllister in 2017. Senator Urquhart told the Senate, ‘This Bill provides policy makers with additional tools to address inequality, and provides the public with the information to hold them to account if they do not.’

The House of Representatives will now consider the bill.

In history

Sitting period 11 to 15 November

On 8 November 1907 a judgement handed down by the High Court introduced the concept of a minimum wage. Read more about the Harvester Judgement on the Federal Parliament History Timeline.

World War 1 ended on 11 November 1918. The Australian Parliament is honouring the Centenary of Armistice through a display of handcrafted poppies and 2 art exhibitions: Lest We Forget and From War. Learn more about the Australian Parliament and World War I on To our last shilling.

Apology to childhood victims of institutional abuse

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

The Prime Minister, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, made a National Apology in the House of Representatives to childhood victims of institutional abuse.  The Apology was one of the recommendations made by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse.

The Prime Minister told the House, ‘Today, as a nation, we confront our failure to listen, to believe and to provide justice. And again today we say sorry—to the children we failed, sorry; to the parents whose trust was betrayed and who have struggled to pick up the pieces, sorry; to the whistleblowers who we did not listen to, sorry; to the spouses, partners, wives, husbands and children who have dealt with the consequences of the abuse, cover-ups and obstruction, sorry; to generations past and present, sorry.’

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, also spoke, saying, ‘Today we offer you our nation's apology, with humility, with honesty, with hope for healing now, and with a fire in our belly to ensure that our children will grow up safe in the future. We do this because it is right, because it is overdue, because Australians must know and face up to the truth about our past. But, above all, we do this because of you. I say to you here in the galleries, here in the Great Hall, on the lawns and beyond, and I say to you in the big cities and country towns: today is because of you.’

The Prime Minister also announced that the National Office For Child Safety will be brought into the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and will report directly to the PM.

Senate estimates

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

Facebook privacy, coral bleaching and the gender pay gap were among some of the issues covered by Senate committees during Budget Estimates hearings.

Often known as ‘Senate estimates’—or simply ‘estimates’—the hearings form an important part of Parliament’s work in scrutinising—closely examining—how government agencies are spending taxpayers’ money.

In estimates hearings, ministers and officials from government departments and agencies appear before one of eight Senate committees, and answer questions about where money has been (or will be) spent. Over a week of hearings, a broad range of issues were discussed including:

  • upcoming fire season outlooks from the Bureau of Meteorology
  • privacy concerns about Facebook
  • proposal to move the Australian embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
  • electronic security of Australia’s electoral systems
  • aggressive magpies at Parliament House
  • coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef
  • National Cancer Screening Register
  • advertising on the sails of the Sydney Opera House
  • live animal exports
  • gender pay gap
  • Invictus Games
  • effect and benefits of inland rail
  • mental health services, including funding for Headspace.

More information

Trans-Pacific Partnership

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

Customs duties on goods from countries who are part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership will be reduced under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Customs Amendment (Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership Implementation) Bill 2018 is one of two bills passed to put the Trans-Pacific Partnership into action. The Partnership is a free trade agreement that was signed in March this year by 11 countries, including Australia, Canada, Japan, Mexico and New Zealand.

Supporting the bill in the Senate, Senator Amanda Stoker said, ‘As Australia is a net exporting country, greater access to the international market will not only benefit our farming communities but also enhance opportunities for our manufacturers.’

Although a number of changes were proposed, the bill passed both houses of Parliament without amendment.

An independent ABC

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

The Senate has referred an inquiry relating to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) to the Senate Environment and Communications References Committee for investigation. The committee will examine the structure and operation of the ABC Board, the editorial independence of the ABC and accusations of political influence in ABC decision-making.

The closing date for submissions to the committee is 13 November 2018. The committee is expected to report to the Parliament by 29 March 2019.

Company tax cuts sooner

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

Small to medium companies will have tax cuts passed by the Parliament earlier this year brought forward by 5 years, under a bill passed by the Parliament.

Companies with an annual turnover up to $50 million will have their current tax rate of 27.5 per cent reduced to 26 per cent in 2020-21 and then 25 per cent in 2021-22 and following years.

Introducing the Treasury Laws Amendment (Lower Taxes for Small and Medium Businesses) Bill 2018 in the House of Representatives, the Treasurer, the Hon Josh Frydenberg MP said, ‘This bill will continue our work of delivering a stronger economy and supporting the more than three million small and medium businesses employing around seven million Australian workers.’

Safer food for our furry friends

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

The Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee has presented its report to Parliament on regulatory approaches to ensure the safety of pet food. It has recommended that:

  • a working group be organised to review pet food standards and labelling
  • the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission explore how to make pet food standards mandatory and set up a system for consumers to complain about pet food
  • the Australian Government work with state and territory governments to investigate any ongoing issues with pet food and develop an education campaign to let the public know where and how to complain.

During the inquiry, the committee heard from a number of witnesses about pet food safety incidents, including cases of megaesophagus in dogs. The committee also noted that Australia has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world.

It’s the thought that counts

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

All gift cards would have a minimum 3-year expiry period, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The rules applying to gift cards will now be consistent across Australia. In addition, the bill also requires expiry dates to be prominently displayed on the gift card and bans a range of fees, including those for balance-checking and inactivity.

Introducing the Treasury Laws Amendment (Gift Cards) Bill 2018 in the House of Representatives, the Assistant Treasurer, the Hon Stuart Robert MP, said ‘Gift card terms and conditions vary widely, making it hard for consumers to understand their rights and obligations. Consumers are often frustrated and experience financial loss from expired cards.’ He added that this bill will ‘make gift cards simpler and fairer for all consumers.’

The view from the cross-bench

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

A number of private senators’ and members’ bills were introduced into the Parliament:

Worth a thousand words

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s portrait has been unveiled at Parliament House. The portrait, by artist Vincent Fantauzzo, now hangs in the Members’ Hall.

In history

Sitting period 15 to 25 October

On 28 October 1916 the Australian people voted ‘no’ in a plebiscite on conscription. Prime Minister Billy Hughes felt that conscription was the only way for Australia to meet its wartime commitments, but he was unable to convince a majority of Australians. A second plebiscite, held just over a year later, also failed.

The Liberal Party of Australia formed on 16 October 1944. Robert Menzies, then Member for Kooyong and former Prime Minister, was one of the driving forces behind the formation of the new party. He went on to lead the Liberal Party to victory at the 1949 election and become Australia’s longest-serving Prime Minister, with a term of 16 years.

On 17 October 1949 the Australian Government, under then Prime Minister Ben Chifley, launched the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme. Over the next 23 years, the Scheme employed more than 100 000 people and it remains an important source of power to this day.

Stronger penalties for food tampering

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

Penalties for tampering with food will be increased under a bill that passed the Parliament. The Criminal Code Amendment (Food Contamination) Bill 2018 was passed in response to the recent contamination of strawberries, which has resulted in economic losses for Australian farmers. Under the new law, the maximum penalty for contaminating goods will be increased to 15 years in prison. The law also includes new offences including threatening to contaminate goods or making false statements regarding the contamination.

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Attorney-General, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said, ‘This bill is intended to send the simplest, clearest and strongest of messages. The behaviour we are now witnessing is not a joke. It is not funny. It is a serious criminal offence, and we denounce it, and offenders of it will face very serious consequences.’

The bill passed both houses of Parliament in a single day. It is the second bill to do this during the 45th Parliament.

Ending live sheep exports

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

Live sheep exports would be phased out over a 5-year period, under a private senator’s bill that has passed the Senate. The Animal Export Legislation Amendment (Ending Long-haul Live Sheep Exports) Bill 2018 aims to immediately ban the export of live sheep and lambs via ship during the northern hemisphere summer and to phase in a ban of any export voyages of longer than 10 days. Introducing the bill to the chamber, Senator Derryn Hinch described live export as ‘a cruel and barbaric practice’ which he had first petitioned against in 1981.

The bill has been introduced into the House of Representatives; however, an attempt by the opposition to make debating and voting on the bill a priority was not successful.

New senator sworn in

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

Greens Senator Larissa Waters was sworn in as a senator for Queensland.  Senator Waters left the Parliament in July last year as she was ineligible to sit in the Senate because of her dual citizenship. She was replaced by Andrew Bartlett who resigned from the Senate in the last sitting period. In his final speech to the Senate, Senator Bartlett signalled his intention to nominate for the electorate of Brisbane at the next federal election.

In cases where a Senate vacancy is caused by the resignation of a senator, section 15 of the Australian Constitution directs that the new senator is appointed by the parliament in the state from which the original senator was chosen.

Expansion of cashless debit card trial

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

The cashless debit card trial already in operation in certain parts of Australia will be expanded to include sites in Bundaberg and Hervey Bay in Queensland, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The trial requires a portion of welfare payments be put into the account of the person receiving the money, which is only accessible with the card. This is designed to ensure these payments are spent on important living costs such as food, clothing and housing, and reduce the risk of money being spent on drugs, alcohol or gambling.

The Attorney-General, the Hon Christian Porter MP, told the House of Representatives that the outcomes of the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 ‘will help to test the card and the technology that supports it in more diverse communities and settings.’

The bill was amended in the Senate to make sure that any review of the government’s trial must be independently evaluated, with trial participants to be consulted and recommendations made about whether the trial should be continued.

Wentworth by-election

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

A by-election for the federal seat of Wentworth in Sydney will be held on 20 October. A by-election is held to fill a single vacancy in the House of Representatives if a member resigns from Parliament, dies or is found ineligible to have been a member. The Wentworth by-election will be held as a result of the resignation of the former Prime Minister, Mr Malcolm Turnbull.

Elephant ivory and rhino horn trade ban

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement has presented its report to Parliament on the trade in elephant ivory and rhinoceros horn.  It has recommended a national domestic trade ban, together with government-led education programs and public awareness campaigns to inform people about why the ban is needed. The committee also recommended that some exemptions apply to elephant ivory already in certain objects (such as old musical instruments and portrait miniatures), with a further recommendation that the Australian Government consider some exemptions for items containing rhinoceros horn.

Social security payment increases

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

Several social security payments made to people who are not in a couple—including Newstart Allowance, Youth Allowance and Austudy—would be increased by $75 a week, under a private senator’s bill introduced in the Senate.

Presenting the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Ending the Poverty Trap) Bill 2018, Greens Senator Rachel Siewert told the chamber, ‘The increase to these payments is to assist in alleviating poverty, reducing income inequality and, where appropriate, to help people to more effectively access study and employment … In a wealthy country like Australia, no one should be left behind. All of us should be free to live a good life with access to socials services—regardless of our postcode, parents or bank balance.’

First speech for Patrick Gorman

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

In his first speech to the House of Representatives, Mr Patrick Gorman, the Member for Perth, spoke of his pride as a West Australian, saying, ‘The Australia I love would be nothing without Perth. Perth is the heart and the brain of Western Australia. Perth is Boorloo, on the banks of the Derbarl Yerrigan, home to Aboriginal leaders past, present and emerging ... Perth welcomes new Australians and has a proud migrant history.’

Mr Gorman listed education and tourism as two of his priorities, seeing a clear link between the two issues. ‘When tourists and visitors come to Australia, they should see a progressive and welcoming country. We demonstrate this to the world through an Indigenous voice to our parliament, enshrined in our Constitution. We demonstrate this to the world when we stand as an Australian republic. We demonstrate this to the world by building the world's best education system from the earliest years right through to lifelong learning.’

In conclusion, the new Member for Perth quoted Prime Minister John Curtin, describing the character and focus of the Australian Labor Party, ‘Labor is a peace-loving party. Its struggle has always been on behalf of the weak against the strong; for the poor, for those who never had a chance as against those whose privileged positions enabled them to prosper—even though millions suffer.’

Food control bill

Sitting period 10 to 20 September

The Parliament has passed a bill to strengthen the safety management system that operates when food is imported into Australia. Several new measures have been put in place to protect food safety, including the need for importers to have a food safety management certificate proving production has been properly managed. Authorities will also have new powers to stop food entering Australia if there is doubt about its safety, until scientific testing is done or the problem can be sorted out. Penalties for breaking new food safety laws will be introduced, ranging from jail terms of up to 10 years and fines of more than $100 000.

Introducing the Imported Food Control Amendment Bill 2017, then Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, said, ‘It is essential that we ensure food being brought into Australia is safe. As globalisation changes how food is traded around the world, we need to strengthen our laws to meet the changing landscape.’

New Prime Minister and ministry

29 August 2018

The parliamentary members of the Liberal Party of Australia have voted to replace the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP as Prime Minister. At a party room meeting, the members chose the former Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, to lead the party, making him the 30th Prime Minister of Australia. The party also voted to replace the Deputy Leader, the Hon Julie Bishop MP, with the former Minister for the Environment and Energy, the Hon Josh Frydenberg MP.

Following his appointment as Prime Minister, Mr Morrison announced a Cabinet reshuffle, changing some portfolios—areas of government responsibility. Mr Frydenburg is the new Treasurer, with his previous portfolio of Environment and Energy being split between two new ministries. The Hon Melissa Price MP enters the ministry to take on the role of Minister for the Environment and the Hon Angus Taylor MP is the new Minister for Energy.

Senator the Hon Marise Payne leaves the role of Minister for Defence to become the Minister for Foreign Affairs, with the Hon Christopher Pyne MP the new Minister for Defence.  The Hon Dan Tehan MP takes on the role of Minister for Education, a role previously filled by Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham, who is now the Minister for Trade.

The Hon Peter Dutton MP remains the Minister for Home Affairs, with the Hon David Coleman MP to be the Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs.

Ministers have been sworn-in to their new roles by the Governor-General at Government House in Canberra.

More information

Company tax cuts bill voted down

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

The Senate has negatived—voted down—the government’s plan to lower tax rates for companies with an annual turnover of more than $50 million. The Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan No. 2) Bill 2017 passed the House of Representatives in February and sought to lower the company tax rate to 25 per cent.

Changes to the bill were proposed in the Senate—including only applying the tax cut to companies with a turnover below $500 million and excluding the big four banks from the lower tax rate—but the bill did not gain support from the opposition and enough of the crossbench to pass the Senate.

Senator Rhiannon’s last speech

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon made her last speech—known as a valedictory statement—to the Senate.

Senator Rhiannon retired from the Senate after serving for 7 years, and before the end of her term of office. Under section 15 of the Australian Constitution, if a senator retires before the end of his or her term, a new senator is appointed to fill the casual vacancy. The appointment is made by the parliament in the state or territory from which the retiring senator was chosen.  The new senator is appointed from the same political party as the previous senator. The NSW Parliament has appointed Dr Mehreen Faruqi to replace Senator Rhiannon.

In her speech, Senator Rhiannon described herself as an ‘outlier’ who, before she became a senator, saw Parliament as ‘a place where we went to protest, not to get a job.’

Later, she explained, ‘Before I came into parliament, I believed that people working together are the drivers of progressive change. Our history illustrates this truth.’ In conclusion, Senator Rhiannon stated, ‘I'm leaving parliament, but I'm not leaving politics. I look forward to returning to the streets. Thank you very much to all my colleagues in this place.’

Senator Faruqi’s first speech

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

In her first speech to the Senate, and as Australia’s first female Muslim senator, Mehreen Faruqi said, ‘Assalamoalikum,’ which is a traditional Arabic greeting of peace. She spoke of her commitment to acknowledging Australia’s colonial history and fighting for the rights of First Nations peoples.

Senator Faruqi went on to describe her experiences as a migrant, arriving in Australia in the early 1990s and her work, ‘in regional New South Wales and in Sydney in the public and private sectors as an engineer, consultant, teacher and academic.’ She explained why she left Pakistan, unable to ‘reconcile an entrenched class divide between the rich and the poor, the women and the men, and the elite and the workers.’ She described Australia as ‘an egalitarian society where ordinary people tended to be treated with dignity and respect’ but acknowledged that racism is still a problem in Australia and that her ‘presence in the Senate is an affront to some. They are offended that people of colour, and Muslims, have the audacity to not only exist but to open our mouths and join the public debate.’

In closing, Senator Faruqi declared, ‘We cannot fiddle around the edges and somehow hope that the tide will turn. We can build a future for each and every one of us, no matter where we come from and no matter the colour of our skin, our religion, our gender or sexuality, our bank balance or our postcode. I hope I can make you proud.’

New MPs enter the House of Representatives

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

By-elections were held in 5 electorates on Saturday 28 July. A by-election is held to fill a single vacancy in the House of Representatives if a member resigns, dies or is found ineligible. Four of the 5 by-elections were caused by members being ineligible due to dual citizenship.

Each seat was won by the party that already held it, so there are no changes to the composition of the House of Representatives. Mr Patrick Gorman replaced Mr Tim Hammond as the Member for Perth. All members were sworn-in to the House of Representatives.

Territory rights bill debated in Senate

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

Senator David Leyonhjelm successfully moved a motion to provide for debate of a private senator’s bill to give the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory the right to introduce laws allowing voluntary euthanasia.

The Restoring Territory Rights (Assisted Suicide Legislation) Bill 2015 sought to repeal—overturn—several laws, or parts of laws, that prevented the territories being able to make laws about euthanasia. In debate on the bill, Senator Leyonhjelm told the chamber, ‘There is no better marker of individual freedom than the ability to decide what to do with our own body. If the law prevents us from making free choices about it, then we are not really free at all; our bodies belong to the State.’

The bill was defeated 36 votes to 34 at the second reading stage in the Senate.

Student loans repayment bill passes Parliament

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

The Parliament has passed the Higher Education Support Legislation Amendment (Student Loan Sustainability) Bill 2018. Under the bill, new repayment thresholds will apply for Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debts, with those thresholds linked to the consumer price index. The Senate agreed to amendments—changes—to the bill, which would require students to begin repaying their HELP debt when they earn $45 880.

New social media images law

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

Posting or threatening to post non-consensual, or unapproved, intimate images on social media will be banned, as a result of the Enhancing Online Safety (Non-consensual Sharing of Intimate Images) Bill 2018 passing the Parliament. This includes the use of media such as email or text messaging, websites and peer-to-peer file-sharing services. The eSafety Commissioner will handle complaints and enforce a civil penalty system (that is a system where financial penalties for individuals or corporations can be handed out).  Criminal offences for sharing of intimate images without consent will also apply.

In history

Sitting period 13 to 23 August

Women were elected to the Australian Parliament for the first time on 21 August 1943. Enid Lyons became the Member for Darwin in the House of Representatives and Dorothy Tangney was chosen to represent Western Australia in the Senate. The Senate remembered these elections with a motion, which quoted Senator Tangney: ‘I ... realise my great honour in being the first woman to be elected to the Senate. But it is not as a woman that I have been elected to this chamber. It is as a citizen of the Commonwealth; and I take my place here with the full privileges and rights of all honourable senators, and, what is still more important, with the full responsibilities which such a high office entails.’

More information

Personal income tax bill passes Parliament

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Personal income tax rates and thresholds will change, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Treasury Laws Amendment (Personal Income Tax Plan) Bill 2018 brings in wide-ranging changes to the taxation system over several years:

  • From the 2018-19 financial year to the 2021-22 financial year, low and middle income earners will be eligible for a tax offset of up to $530.
  • In the 2018-19 financial year, the threshold for the 32.5 per cent tax rate will increase from $87 000 to $90 000.
  • From 1 July 2022, the threshold for the 32.5 per cent tax rate will again increase from $90 000 to $120 000. The threshold for the 19 per cent tax rate will increase from $37 000 to $41 000. The low income tax offset will also increase.
  • From 1 July 2024, the top threshold of the 32.5 per cent tax bracket will again increase from $120 000 to $200 000. The 37 per cent tax bracket will be abolished, cutting the number of tax brackets from 5 to 4.

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, said, ‘This bill implements the Turnbull government's Personal Income Tax Plan to make personal income taxes lower, simpler and fairer. It's about providing tax relief for working Australians, particularly those on middle to low incomes.’

Preventing foreign interference in Australian politics

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Individuals and organisations who participate in Australian political life would have to declare any foreign ties or funding under a bill passed by the Parliament.

Introducing the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Bill 2018, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, explained that the scheme is, ‘intended to provide transparency for the Australian government and the Australian public about the forms and sources of foreign influence in Australia.’

Senator Stoker’s first speech

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Senator Amanda Stoker was chosen by the Queensland Parliament under section 15 of the Australian Constitution to fill the casual vacancy created by Senator Brandis’s resignation. In her first speech to the Senate, she observed that, ‘Australians don't trust politicians.’ She spoke about the importance of self-reliance: ‘The government can't be the answer to all problems, nor should it be. If it is the answer then you've got a problem with your question. The loss of individual self-reliance makes our society weaker.’

Senator Stoker also spoke about her home state of Queensland. ‘There are 11 other senators here who will agree with me about my chosen home state. Queensland is a magnificent place—from the cape to Coolangatta and Cameron Corner. It has beautiful landscapes: the beach, the rainforest, the bush and the desert. We are rich in minerals, leaders in agriculture and an exporter of education.’

In closing, the senator quoted President John F Kennedy, ‘With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own.’

Tackling modern slavery in supply chains

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Australian businesses would be required to report on how they are reducing the risks of modern slavery in their supply chains, under a bill introduced in the House of Representatives.

Introducing the Modern Slavery Bill 2018, the Assistant Minister for Home Affairs, the Hon Alex Hawke MP, told the House, ‘This significant initiative will shine a light into the shadows of global supply chains where modern slavery thrives ... This bill will send a clear message that modern slavery is unacceptable in the supply chains of all of our goods and services.’

More information

Investigation into video game loot boxes

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

The Senate has asked the Environment and Communications References Committee to investigate whether buying chance-based items in video games is a form of gambling and what consumer protections are in place for gamers who buy items in games using micro-transactions. The committee plans to report by 17 September 2018.

New senator for the ACT

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Mr David Smith was sworn-in as senator for the Australian Capital Territory, replacing former Senator Katy Gallagher, who was found ineligible to be in Parliament as a result of her dual citizenship.

In his first speech to the Senate, Senator Smith spoke about undertaking a trek through the ACT to speak with residents about their concerns, which included, ‘insecure employment, housing affordability, rising utility bills in a city where heating is a must and ensuring kids are getting breakfast before school.’ He named the 790 kilometre walk a ‘Camino de Canberra.’

He described the importance of the public service in Canberra stating that, ‘Strong government needs to be driven by a workforce motivated by the public good rather than commercial interests.’ He joked about his name being common and paid tribute to a number of other David Smiths from the former secretary to the Governor-General to union officials.

Senator Smith closed his speech with a quote from John Smith, the former leader of the UK Labour Party, ‘The opportunity to serve—that is all we ask.’

Lowering the voting age

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

The voting age would be lowered to 16, under a private senator’s bill introduced in the Senate. The Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering Voting Age and Increasing Voter Participation) Bill 2018 was introduced by Greens Senator Jordan Steele-John.

In explaining the bill, Senator Steele-John pointed out that young people have many rights and responsibilities already: ‘young people can work full time and pay taxes. They can own and drive a car, contributing to the maintenance of our roads and transport infrastructure. They can have sex and make decisions about their bodies. They can be treated as adults by our justice system. But they can't vote.’

The bill would allow 16 and 17 year olds to vote on a voluntary basis. It would be compulsory to vote from the age of 18. The bill also proposes allowing Australians to update their electoral roll information at a polling place on election day, rather than having to meet the ‘close of rolls’ date before each federal election.

The bill has been referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters for inquiry and report by 18 October.

Maintaining Australia’s national interests in Antarctica

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

Access to the Australian Antarctic Territory would be improved under recommendations made in a report presented by the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories. The report noted that Australia is investing in infrastructure to guarantee year-round access to Australian research bases.

This includes a paved runway at Davis research station and a new icebreaker ship. The new icebreaker will be called Nuyina, which is a Tasmanian Aboriginal word meaning ‘southern lights’. The name was suggested by students from two schools: St Virgil’s College in Hobart and Secret Harbour Primary School in Western Australia.

Among other recommendations, the report suggested that the government establish an Office of Antarctic Services to promote Hobart as a gateway to Antarctica and appoint an Antarctic ambassador.

In presenting the report, Mr Ben Morton MP, the chair of the committee said, ‘The Australian Antarctic Program positions our nation amongst the world's most significant contributors on this continent.’

In history

Sitting period 18 to 28 June

On 12 June 1902, the Governor-General signed the Commonwealth Franchise Act 1902. This gave many women, who were Australian citizens and over the age of 21, the right to vote in federal elections and to stand for election for the federal Parliament. It would be another 41 years before the first women took their seats in the Australian Parliament.

On 10 June 1908, the Australian Parliament agreed to a new law that guaranteed income support to the elderly. The Invalid and Old Age Pension Act 1908 set the model for Australian social security for the next 100 years.

The United Nations was founded on 26 June 1945. Australian member of parliament and judge, HV ‘Doc’ Evatt, served as President of the United Nations General Assembly from 1948 — 1949 and helped to write the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

On 3 June 1992, the High Court decided the result of the case Mabo v Queensland. The Court’s decision recognised the existence of native title and overturned the principle of terra nullius—the belief that land in Australia was not owned by Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Senate estimates

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

Severe weather events, NAPLAN testing and foreign aid were among some of the issues covered by Senate committees during Budget Estimates hearings.

Often known as ‘Senate estimates’—or simply ‘estimates’—the hearings form an important part of Parliament’s work in scrutinising—closely examining—how government agencies are spending taxpayers’ money.

In estimates hearings, ministers and officials from government departments and authorities appear before one of eight Senate committees, and answer questions about where money has been (or will be) spent. Over a week of hearings, a broad range of issues were discussed including:

  • oil and gas exploration in Australian Marine Parks
  • new medical schools in regional areas
  • noise monitoring around airports
  • plans to allow police to request people show identification in airports
  • how doctors will apply to prescribe medical cannabis
  • Bureau of Meteorology’s findings on exceptional heat events in Australia
  • delays in the rollout of the NAPLAN online program
  • funding for the National Suicide Prevention Trial
  • reviews of voluntary pet food standards
  • Australian aid funding to the Palestinian Territories
  • eradication of red imported fire ants
  • funding for national access to early childhood education
  • radioactive waste management
  • Australia’s involvement in responding to an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo
  • broadband access for small businesses in regional and rural areas.

More information

Super Saturday of by-elections

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

The Speaker of the House of Representatives announced that by-elections in the electorates of Braddon, Fremantle, Longman, Mayo and Perth will be held on 28 July. The Australian Electoral Commission advised that this date would allow people to comply with requirements in order to nominate themselves as a candidate.

National Redress Scheme

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

In response to recommendations from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse, the government has introduced a bill to establish a national redress scheme that will provide compensation and counselling to survivors of abuse. Through the scheme, survivors may also be able to receive a direct personal response from the institution, which could include an apology or an acknowledgement of the impact of the abuse.

Introducing the bill to the House of Representatives, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said that the scheme ‘recognises the suffering survivors have experienced and accepts that these events occurred and that institutions must take responsibility for this abuse.’

Also supporting the bill, the Hon Jenny Macklin MP said that the Parliament, ‘must uphold our responsibilities to the survivors. We must not fail them as a society. We must not fail them again, and we must establish a national redress scheme, and this time we have to make sure we get it right.’

The bill, introduced by the government and supported by the opposition and members on the crossbench, has passed the House of Representatives and will be debated in the Senate when it next meets.

More information

Member’s first speech

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

In her first speech to the House of Representatives, Ms Ged Kearney MP, the newly-elected Member for Batman, paid tribute to Australia’s first peoples, particularly the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation, saying, ‘The Aboriginal community has always been at the heart of Batman's identity.’ Ms Kearney spoke of her large family and their ‘dinnertime parliament’, which shaped her view of community and of the world, and inspired her activism. She explained what solidarity meant to her ‘as a mum, as a nurse and as a trade unionist’, saying ‘Solidarity is the expression of our shared humanity...It is the fundamental recognition that the greatest human dignity is the experience of opportunity and equality.’

Ms Kearney also addressed the issue of asylum seekers, describing it as ‘a passionate and emotional issue for the voters in Batman's community.’ She closed her speech with a quote from Prime Minister Ben Chifley, ‘I try to think of the Labour movement, not as putting an extra sixpence into somebody's pocket, or making somebody Prime Minister or Premier, but as a movement bringing something better to the people, better standards of living, greater happiness to the mass of the people. We have a great objective—the light on the hill—which we aim to reach by working for the betterment of mankind not only here but anywhere we may give a helping hand.’

Live sheep export bill

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

The export of live sheep by ship to Middle Eastern countries would be phased out over 5 years, under a private member’s bill introduced in the House of Representatives. The Live Sheep Long Haul Export Prohibition Bill 2018 was introduced by the Member for Farrer, the Hon Sussan Ley MP, and seconded by the Member for Corangamite, Ms Sarah Henderson MP.

The bill proposed an end to live export during July, August and September 2019, with a transition period of 5 years after this to gradually end all live trade. This would allow farmers and the meat industry to identify new markets and production methods in that timeframe.

Ms Ley recounted her time living in the United Arab Emirates, working in Australia as a mustering pilot, in shearing sheds and as a sheep farmer, telling the House ‘In the modern world ethics and sustainability in the production of food and fibre are vital. Sanctioning further voyages on these ships of shame, particularly into a Middle Eastern summer, damages our brand.’

In history

Sitting period 21 to 31 May

On 30 May 1916, the Australian Soldiers' Repatriation Fund Act 1916 received Royal Assent. The Act, which was negotiated between the state governments and the federal government, created a fund to help soldiers returning from the First World War to start farms.

On 17 May 1932, the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC) was formed when the Australian Broadcasting Commission Act 1932 received Royal Assent.On 1 July that year,its first transmission was a broadcast by the leaders of Australia’s 3 main political parties: Prime Minister Joseph Lyons (United Australia Party), Leader of the Opposition James Scullin (Australian Labor Party), and Dr Earle Page (Country Party). Find out more on the Federal Parliament History Timeline.

On 27 May 1967, over 90 per cent of Australians voted ‘Yes’ to allow the federal Parliament to make laws specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and to remove discriminatory references to Indigenous Australians from the Constitution. Find out more on the Federal Parliament History Timeline and in Get Parliament online.

On 28 May 2000, 250 000 Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians walked across the Sydney Harbour Bridge in support of reconciliation. In 2018, this date became the Reconciliation Day public holiday in the Australian Capital Territory.

Government presents its Budget

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

As part of its 2018-19 Budget, the Turnbull Government intends to focus on more jobs for Australians, guaranteeing essential services and living within its means.

The federal Budget is the government’s annual statement of how it plans to collect and spend money for the coming financial year and further years. It includes details about taxation and other measures the government uses to raise funds, and outlines the areas and activities where funds will be spent—for  example, covering  costs in the education system, welfare payments and infrastructure such as roads and railways.

Presenting the 2018-19 Budget speech to the House of Representatives, the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, said ‘Our record of financial responsibility means that under our plan, Australians can plan for their future with confidence.’

Among measures proposed in the Budget, the Treasurer announced:

  • wide-ranging changes to the personal income tax system to be introduced over 7 years, including initial tax cuts for lower and middle income earners, with the final outcome of a simplified threshold system of only two tax rates by 2024-25
  • funding for a permanent school chaplains program, with a focus on anti-bullying
  • the establishment of a national space agency, at a cost of $50 million
  • $1.4 billion for new drugs to be added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme to help seriously ill patients afford important medicines
  • plans to add 14 000 care packages for older Australians to assist them to age in their own homes

The Budget is introduced into the Parliament as a series of appropriation bills. These bills—proposed laws—are examined by both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Once both chambers are in agreement, the bills are sent to the Governor-General for Royal Assent.

More information

Opposition Leader’s Budget reply

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

Delivering his reply to the federal Budget, the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, told the House of Representatives that a Labor government would focus on funding health and education and creating a fairer tax system for the nation.

Like the Treasurer’s Budget speech, the Budget reply provides an opportunity for the Leader of the Opposition to publicly outline their party’s views on the government’s proposed Budget. The reply speech is an important part of scrutinising—carefully examining—the Budget and holding the government to account. It also allows the opposition to set out any alternative policies they have regarding proposals to raise and spend money.

The Leader of the Opposition announced Budget measures that would be introduced under a Labor Party government, including:

  • bigger tax cuts for lower and middle income earners
  • a renewed commitment to 50 per cent use of renewable energy by 2030
  • funding for 100 000 TAFE places in high-priority areas of skills shortages
  • new MRI machines in 20 hospitals in regional areas and outer suburbs, to help patients manage serious illnesses.

In his speech, Mr Shorten declared Australia ‘needs a government that will deliver a fair go for all Australians. That is what we deliver. That is our promise.’

Section 44 of the Constitution

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

Following the High Court’s ruling that found Ms Katy Gallagher ineligible to serve in the Australian Senate, 4 members of the House of Representatives resigned. Former Senator Gallagher was found not to have renounced her British citizenship before nominating as a candidate for the 2016 election. In response to the ruling, Ms Susan Lamb, Mr Josh Wilson, Ms Justine Keay and Ms Rebekha Sharkie resigned as well. They also held dual citizenship and did not have their British citizenship renunciation finalised before the deadline to nominate as candidates.

Ms Gallagher’s position will be filled by a countback of the ACT Senate votes in the 2016 election. By-elections will be held in the electorates of Longman, Fremantle, Braddon and Mayo to replace the members of the House of Representatives.

A by-election will also be held in the electorate of Perth following the resignation of Mr Tim Hammond. Mr Hammond resigned to spend more time with his family.

Senator Storer’s first speech

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed senator for South Australia, Mr Tim Storer, acknowledged the Ngunnawal people (the traditional owners of Canberra), and the Kaurna people (the traditional owners of the Adelaide plains). Later, he recognized ‘the legacy of trauma and grief in communities as a result of colonisation, forced removals and other past government policies.’ Senator Storer paid tribute to his former party colleagues and to his parents and teachers, whose values are expressed in St Ignatius’ College ‘Prayer for Generosity’.

Senator Storer went on to say that ‘society is judged ... on how it treats its most vulnerable’ and listed the refugee crisis, homelessness, cost-of-living, housing affordability, and unemployment allowances as priorities he hopes to address. Senator Storer closed his speech by acknowledging that his initial term in the Senate will be just 500 days, and pledging to ‘make every day count and judge every issue on its merits against the benchmarks of integrity, fairness, prosperity and sustainability.’

Removal of sanitary items tax

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

Goods and services tax (GST) would be removed from menstruation sanitary items, under a private senator’s bill introduced in the Senate.

The GST was introduced almost 20 years ago when the Parliament passed A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999. Since then, sanitary items like tampons and pads have been subject to GST, but other health items like sunscreen have not.

Introducing the Treasury Laws Amendment (Axe the Tampon Tax) Bill 2018, Greens Senator Janet Rice said, ‘I am introducing this bill on behalf of every person who has signed a petition, attended a protest, written to their MP, or felt the financial burden of this unfair tax. This reform is long overdue.’

Parliament House celebrates 30 years

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

Parliament House celebrated its 30th birthday with several special events, including a performance by the Canberra Symphony Orchestra, a panel of special guests sharing their personal and political stories about the building and a special exhibition about its design competition and construction.

On 9 May, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Hon Tony Smith MP, the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Scott Ryan and the Governor-General , His Excellency General the Hon Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) welcomed visitors to the Forecourt to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the opening of Parliament House.

A Welcome to Country and a Smoking Ceremony were held, the ACT Primary Concert Choir performed, and a birthday cake was cut and distributed to the crowds gathered for the celebration.

Investigation into Australia’s obesity epidemic

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

The Senate has created a select committee to investigate the obesity epidemic in Australia. The committee will focus on:

  • obesity among children and how it has changed over time
  • causes of obesity and its economic cost
  • health problems associated with obesity
  • how obesity is prevented overseas
  • the role of the food industry in contributing to childhood obesity.

The committee plans to report on 14 August 2018.

More information

NDIS protections

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

A national scheme will be set up to screen workers in the disability sector to protect people with disability who access services through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), under a bill passed by the Parliament.

The Crimes Amendment (National Disability Insurance Scheme—Worker Screening) Bill 2018 detailed wide-ranging measures. Workers with registered NDIS providers who provide higher risk supports and services will need to have a new NDIS Worker Screening Check, to be rolled out over the next two years. NDIS participants who manage their own plans will also have access to information about these workers. The national scheme means that consistent checks can be put in place and information shared about workers’ criminal history records anywhere in Australia.

The Australian Government has set up the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission to design and run worker screening, register NDIS providers, respond to complaints and manage reported incidents of harm to people with disability in the NDIS.

Rotary Adventure in Citizenship

Sitting period 8 to 10 May

Thirty-six year 11 students from around Australia have been given a behind-the-scenes look at the Parliament during Budget week, as part of this year’s Rotary Adventure in Citizenship.

During the week-long program, students gained a unique perspective on Parliament in action, met their federal member of parliament and participated in law-making debates and other learning activities.

New senators sworn-in

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

With the swearing-in of two new senators, the Senate now has a complete membership of 76 for the first time since 14 July last year. The President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Scott Ryan, tweeted that this is the longest period of time since federation that the Senate has had vacancies.

Mr Tim Storer was sworn-in as a senator for South Australia, replacing former Senator Skye Kakoschke-Moore, who was found ineligible to be in Parliament as a result of her dual citizenship.

Ms Amanda Stoker was sworn-in as a senator for Queensland, replacing former Senator George Brandis, who left Parliament to take up the post of High Commissioner of Australia to the United Kingdom.

First speeches for senators

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed Senator Steve Martin likened himself to Steven Bradbury, saying, ‘there is a hidden moral in Bradbury's unlikely success story about being positive, having a dream, backing yourself against the odds and giving things a red-hot go.’ Senator Martin spoke about his positive outlook for Tasmania, while not ignoring some of the state’s challenges: biosecurity, trade, and education. Senator Martin quoted economist Douglas Copland, who said education is ‘the most profitable investment a community can make.’ Another issue he highlighted was the lack of Tasmanian representation in the both the men’s and women’s competitions of the AFL (Australian Football League). In closing, Senator Martin quoted children’s author Dr Seuss, ‘It's not about what it is; it's about what it can become.’

Senator Kristina Keneally also made her first speech, telling the chamber that although she had not expected to come back to politics, she was proud to be in the Senate, representing the people of New South Wales. She highlighted inequality, a national integrity commission, and clean energy as priorities for her service in the Senate. She particularly focused on inequality, saying, ‘A society is only healthy when its most vulnerable members are supported, protected and included. Fairness doesn't trickle down.’ She also spoke of the tragedy of stillbirths, and her work with Stillbirth Foundation Australia. She thanked the Senate for voting to hold a select committee inquiry into the issue. Senator Keneally ended her speech by saying, ‘No matter what else I might do on this earth, being Daniel and Brendan's mother is the best role I'll ever have. For them, and for all young people in Australia, I want to help build a stronger, fairer and more generous nation. And now that this first speech is done, it's time to get on with that task.’

House of Representatives

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

Ms Ged Kearney has been sworn in as the Member for Batman in Victoria after a by-election in that seat. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives are now filled.

The Member for Page, Mr Kevin Hogan MP, has been elected to the position of Deputy Speaker. He replaces the Hon Mark Coulton MP, who stepped down from the role to become Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment.

Welfare reform bill

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

The Parliament has passed a bill to streamline Australia’s welfare system. The Social Services Legislation Amendment (Welfare Reform) Bill 2017 combined a number of welfare payments, including Newstart, sickness, and bereavement allowances, into a single jobseeker payment. The Senate requested amendments, or changes, to the bill, and waited until the House of Representatives had agreed to the changes before finally agreeing to the bill and reading it a third time.

In supporting the Senate amendments, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said in the House that the bill ‘is critical to ensure that our welfare system remains strong and sustainable into the future.’ The opposition supported the amendments, but argued that the bill would leave disadvantaged Australians with less support. The Shadow Minister for Families and Social Services, the Hon Jenny Macklin MP replied, ‘We do not think this will make Australia a fairer or stronger place’.

Measures to introduce drug testing of jobseekers were previously removed from this bill. The measures  have been introduced in a separate bill, the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Drug Testing Trial) Bill 2018, which is currently before the House of Representatives.

Mental health services in rural and remote Australia

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

The Senate Community Affairs References Committee is investigating the accessibility and quality of mental health services in rural and remote areas across Australia. They are particularly interested in why people in these areas access mental health services at a lower rate, the challenges of delivering services and how technology might help. The committee will be accepting submissions until 11 May and is expected to report by 17 October.

Increased support for regional universities

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

A National Regional Higher Education Strategy recognising the role of regional universities and supporting government policy would be developed, under a private member’s bill introduced in the House of Representatives.  The strategy would include measures to:

  • increase the number of regional students in higher education
  • support students moving between secondary and tertiary education
  • address the declining population of young people in regional areas
  • help regional higher education providers in creating resilient communities.

The Member for Indi, Ms Cathy McGowan MP, introduced the Higher Education Support Amendment (National Regional Higher Education Strategy) Bill 2018, saying, ‘the delivery of higher education in regional Australia is central to the economic prosperity of this nation.’ She also noted that ‘regional universities play a unique role in developing our regional economies, contributing to social and cultural development.’ The bill was supported by the Member for Mayo, Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP.

Speaking out about domestic violence

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

Members of the Tangentyere Women’s Family Safety Group from Alice Springs made the long journey to Parliament House to highlight domestic violence in regional and remote communities. Women from the group shared their stories with members of parliament and sat, placing flowers on the grass at Parliament House, in memory of other women who had died after being assaulted. Northern Territory Senator Malarndirri McCarthy spoke about the work of the women’s group, saying, ‘These women have travelled from Alice Springs and to be heard, their message is simple, “listen to us, stand with us, support us”. They work every day for their communities because they have the solutions and we need to make sure their voices are heard and listened to, we can learn a lot from these women.’

Inquiry into industrial deaths in Australia

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

The Senate has asked the Education and Employment References Committee to review how industrial deaths in Australia can be prevented and how they are investigated and prosecuted when they do happen. The committee is seeking submissions until 6 June and will report in September.

Bill to combat homelessness

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

The Parliament has passed a bill to change the way the federal government gives funding to states and territories to provide housing and homelessness services. In order to receive funding in the future, states and territories will have to develop a housing and homelessness strategy and report this to the federal government.

The new National Housing and Homelessness Agreement between the federal and state/territory governments will ensure funding is secure, with around $4.6 billion in total to be provided between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2021.

Introducing the Treasury Laws Amendment (National Housing and Homelessness Agreement) Bill 2018, the Assistant Minister to the Treasurer, the Hon Michael Sukkar MP, said, ‘Housing is fundamental to the wellbeing of all Australians. It is a driver of social and economic participation and promotes better employment, education and health outcomes.’

Mental health of first responders and emergency service workers

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

The Senate Education and Employment References Committee will investigate the causes of mental health conditions in first responders and emergency service workers and how these conditions are being managed. The committee will accept submissions until 20 June and is expected to report by 5 December.

In history

Sitting period 19 to 28 March

On 29-30 March 1901, the first election for the Australian Parliament was held. On 1 January of that year, Sir Edmund Barton had taken the oath of office to become Australia’s first Prime Minister. Find out more information about federal elections and the Prime Minister.

On 24 March 1997 the Australian Parliament overturned the world’s first euthanasia law. The law, which was passed in the Northern Territory, allowed doctors to end a terminally ill patient’s life at the patient’s request. Section 122 of the Australian Constitution allows the Parliament to override a territory law at any time. Find out more information on this power in this Closer Look paper.

New Deputy Prime Minister

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

Following the resignation of the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP as the leader of The Nationals, the Hon Michael McCormack MP has been elected as the new leader.

Mr McCormack's elevation to the leadership means he becomes the Deputy Prime Minister. This is because the Liberal Party of Australia and The Nationals have formed a coalition government, and under this arrangement the Prime Minister is usually drawn from the larger party and the Deputy Prime Minister from the smaller party.

Ministry changes

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

A minor reshuffle of the ministry has occurred as a result of the Hon Michael McCormack MP taking over as leader of The Nationals and Deputy Prime Minister:

  • The Hon Darren Chester MP, the Member for Gippsland, has returned to the front bench, becoming Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel, and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Centenary of Anzac.
  • The Hon Keith Pitt MP, the Member for Hinkler, has taken on the role of Minister Assisting the Deputy Prime Minister.
  • The Hon Mark Coulton MP, the Member for Parkes, has become the Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment.

 

More information

A step towards recognition

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

The House of Representatives has agreed to form a committee to inquire into recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Australian Constitution. The Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition will consider previous recommendations, including those of the Referendum Council and the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It will investigate the ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are consulted on issues which affect them.

In supporting the idea for the committee, the Hon Linda Burney MP said, ‘This committee will provide us with an opportunity to come together in a spirit of bipartisanship and with the goodwill to constructively realise the aspirations of First Nations peoples outlined in the Uluru statement. It is clear that the First Nations people want a greater say, involvement and participation in the decisions that affect them.’

The committee will be made up of members of the House of Representatives and senators from across the political spectrum. It is due to report in November this year.

Bill to introduce trial of drug testing

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

The government has introduced a bill into the House of Representatives to set up a two-year trial of drug testing for 5000 people receiving new payments of Newstart and youth allowances, starting from 1 July 2018. The Social Services Legislation Amendment (Drug Testing Trial) Bill 2018 aims to identify jobseekers with drug abuse issues and to help them recover and get a job. The trial would operate in three locations around the nation, with a fund of up to $10 million to support jobseekers who want to access treatment.

A range of measures would apply as part of the trial, including cancellation of a payment if a jobseeker refuses to take a drug test, with a four-week wait until they can reapply for a payment. In addition, a positive drug test result would result in a jobseeker being placed on income management, meaning their access to cash would be limited, but their payment would not be stopped.

Introducing the bill, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said, ‘The government wants to ensure that the welfare system provides strong incentives for people with substance abuse issues to get treatment, rehabilitate and find a job.’

The Senate agreed to remove the proposed trial from the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Welfare Reform) Bill 2017, which is currently before the Senate.

Broadband speeds

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

Telecommunications companies, or telcos, would have to be honest in providing details when selling their broadband services, under a private member’s bill introduced in the House of Representatives. The bill would require that telcos be banned from claiming services of a particular quality, unless other information is supplied. This information includes:

  • Typical, rather than maximum, internet speeds that can be expected.
  • Typical busy periods and what that can mean for average internet speeds.
  • Other things that might be expected to affect internet performance.

A penalty of up to $1.1 million would apply to telcos that don’t obey the new requirements.

Introducing the Competition and Consumer Amendment (Misleading Representations About Broadband Speeds) Bill 2018, the Member for Denison, Mr Andrew Wilkie MP, told the House, ‘Of course, this is a complex matter and there's obviously a range of factors that affect speed and performance. No-one is denying that, and the …[bill] doesn't seek to deny it. What it does do is stop telcos making misleading claims about quality and speeds that the average customer will never actually receive.’

Senate Estimates

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

Renewable energy sources, mental health services and university funding were among some of the issues covered by Senate committees during Supplementary Budget Estimates hearings.

Often known as ‘Senate estimates’, or simply ‘estimates’, the hearings form an important part of Parliament’s work in scrutinising, or closely examining, how government agencies are spending taxpayers’ money.

In estimates hearings, ministers and officials from government departments and authorities appear before one of eight Senate committees, and answer questions about where money has been (or will be) spent. Over a week of hearings, a diverse range of issues were discussed including:

  • Impact of climate change on the Murray-Darling Basin.
  • Operations of Australian Border Force.
  • Restricting gambling advertising during live sports broadcasts.
  • Security upgrades at Australia’s Parliament House.
  • Proposed trial of drug testing of people receiving welfare payments.
  • White spot disease in prawns imported into Australia.
  • Using pumped hydro as a means of storing renewable energy.
  • Young doctors’ ability to access mental health treatment.
  • The Australian Government’s agreement with the US in relation to asylum seekers.
  • Centrelink’s capacity to answer telephone calls within acceptable wait times.
  • Proposed company tax cuts.
  • Recall of faulty air bags in cars.
  • Impact of freeze on university funding.
  • Trial of assistance dogs to help veterans with post traumatic issues.
  • Mobile Black Spot Program.

NDIS protections

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

The House of Representatives has passed a bill setting up a national scheme to screen workers in the disability sector, to protect people with disability who access services through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

The Crimes Amendment (National Disability Insurance Scheme—Worker Screening) Bill 2018 set out wide-ranging measures. Workers with registered NDIS providers who provide higher risk supports and services would need to have a new NDIS Worker Screening Check, to be rolled out over the next two years. NDIS participants who manage their own plans would also have access to information about these workers. The national scheme would mean that consistent checks could be put in place and information shared about workers’ criminal history records anywhere in Australia.

The Australian Government has set up the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission to design and run worker screening, register NDIS providers, respond to complaints and manage reported incidents of harm to people with disability in the NDIS.

Introducing the bill, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said, ‘This bill aims to help protect and prevent people with disability from harm from the people working closely with them. It will provide transparency for providers, people with a disability and their families.’

New homes for Parliament House possums

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

The gardeners at Australian Parliament House manage 23 hectares of garden, including courtyards, formal gardens, and native bushland. This space is inhabited by a variety of wildlife, including brushtail possums. In order to discourage possums from nesting in drainpipes and sheds, the innovative staff have built plush possum boxes for the building’s native inhabitants. Several possum families have already moved into their new homes.

Keeping the sea pollution free

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

One of Australia’s international obligations in relation to sea protection would be put into action, under a bill introduced in the House of Representatives. The Protection of the Sea Legislation Amendment Bill 2018 would require the master of a ship to have information about cargoes on board before releasing any residues, or remains. This would ensure that residues are only released into the sea where it has been declared this will not harm the marine environment.

The then Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Damian Drum MP, told the House, ‘as a government, it is our duty to ensure that our laws for the prevention of marine pollution are adequate, up to date and consistent with international law.’

Honey, I won an award

Sitting period 26 February to 1 March

Parliament House honey has won second prize at the Royal Canberra Show. Cormac Farrell, head beekeeper at Parliament House, thanked the landscaping team for creating beautiful bee-friendly gardens.

Changes in the Parliament

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The first sitting period for 2018 saw a number of changes announced in the Senate:

  • Senator Lucy Gichuhi, formerly an Independent, announced that she had joined the Liberal Party of Australia and in future will be sitting with the government.
  • Senator Fraser Anning announced that he had resigned from Pauline Hanson’s One Nation and will continue as an Independent.
  • Mr Jim Molan was sworn-in as a senator for New South Wales to replace former Senator Fiona Nash.
  • Mr Richard Colbeck was sworn-in as a senator for Tasmania to replace former Senator Stephen Parry.
  • Mr Steve Martin was sworn-in as a senator for Tasmania to replace former Senator Jacqui Lambie and announced he will be sitting as an Independent.
  • The Hon Kristina Keneally was sworn-in as a senator for New South Wales to replace former Senator Sam Dastyari.

In the House of Representatives:

  • Mr John Alexander OAM MP was sworn-in as the Member for Bennelong, in Sydney, after winning last year’s by-election in that seat.
  • A by-election will be held in the electorate of Batman, in Melbourne, following the resignation of Mr David Feeney as the sitting member. Mr Feeney resigned as a result of his dual citizenship. The by-election will be held on 17 March.

Closing the Gap

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, presented the annual Closing the Gap statement, which sets out targets for improving the lives of Indigenous Australians. There are seven targets:

  • Halve the gap in child mortality by 2018 (on track).
  • Have 95 per cent of all Indigenous four-year-olds enrolled in early childhood education by 2025 (on track).
  • Close the gap in school attendance by 2018 (not on track).
  • Halve the gap in reading and numeracy by 2018 (not on track).
  • Halve the gap in Year 12 attainment by 2020 (on track).
  • Halve the gap in employment by 2018 (not on track).
  • Close the gap in life expectancy by 2031 (not on track).

In his statement, the Prime Minister noted that three of the seven targets are on track to be met, and the other four are showing improvement, but will not be met by the deadlines. He also highlighted the government’s commitment to the Indigenous Procurement Policy, which encourages investment in Indigenous businesses. The Prime Minister emphasised that, ‘We can not close the gap if we do not have equal participation in the economy.’

Responding to the Prime Minister’s speech, the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, focused on Kevin Rudd’s 2008 apology to the stolen generations, saying, ‘the apology was so much more than a set of well-chosen words. I believe it was more than just an expression of sorrow and regret. It was a declaration of intent. It was a promise for action.’

Both leaders underlined that the key to closing the gap is consultation with Indigenous Australians.

Statements on Royal Commission into Child Abuse

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, will make an official apology in the Parliament later this year to victims of institutional abuse. The Prime Minister announced this as part of a statement to the House of Representatives about the Royal Commission into Child Abuse. The Prime Minister told the House, ‘As a nation, we must mark this occasion in a form that reflects the wishes of survivors and affords them the dignity to which they were entitled as children but which was denied to them by the very people who were tasked with their care.’

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, also spoke, saying to survivors, ‘“Australia believes you. Australia thanks you. Your bravery and honesty has done something that no parliament, no court, no media outlet on its own could or would ever do. You faced us up to a hard truth about our history, and you have shown us that we must do better in the future.”’

Company tax cuts

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The rate at which companies pay income tax would be lowered under a bill passed by the House of Representatives. Introducing the bill, the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, told the House the new arrangement ‘is designed to make our company tax system more competitive on the international stage.’

Last year, the Parliament passed the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan) Act 2017 which will progressively lower the company tax rate from 30 per cent to 25 per cent, with the tax cuts rolling out until 2018-19, based on a company's annual turnover up to $50 million.

Under the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan No. 2) Bill 2017, the company tax rate would be lowered to 25 per cent for all companies by 2026-27. The Treasurer added, ‘for the workers of Australia, the majority of the gains from a company tax cut are expected to flow through to Australian workers in the form of increases in real wages. This is why the government's Enterprise Tax Plan is essential to supporting Australian jobs and wages into the future.’

The bill will now be considered by the Senate.

Farewell Senator Brandis

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

After 18 years representing Queensland in the Australian Parliament, Senator the Hon George Brandis QC gave his final speech to the Senate. He spoke about traditional liberal values, including defending the rights of individuals and respect for institutions. He also spoke about the rule of law, and his own role as Attorney-General, quoting former Prime Minister, Sir Robert Menzies, ‘Do not let us begin to think lightly of the law. Its rule, its power, its authority are the centre of our civilisation.’

Senator Brandis highlighted the importance of bi-partisan approaches to national security. He also reflected on his good fortune in having had the opportunity to serve in three governments and to nominate Australia’s first woman Chief Justice of the High Court.

He summarised his achievements, ‘So, by one of those remarkable coincidences with which politics is so replete, the two great pieces of law reform by which I had hoped to define my attorney-generalship—achieving marriage equality and reforming our national security laws; two issues that could hardly be more different—converged in the final minutes of the parliamentary year.’

Senator Brandis leaves the Parliament to take up the post of High Commissioner of Australia to the United Kingdom.

Murray-Darling Basin Plan changes blocked

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

Changes to the Murray-Darling Basin Plan to reduce water recovery targets have been blocked by the Senate. The Plan was originally set up to ensure the health of the Murray-Darling river system and provide fair water distribution to all users. The changes would have seen the water recovery target in the northern basin reduced by 70 billion litres of water. This was opposed by some farmers in southern areas, as well as environmentalists, who were concerned the reduction in water flow would damage ecosystems downstream.

The change was to be made by regulation, or delegated law, in which the Parliament gives the power to make decisions about the details of laws to the relevant government minister, executive office-holder or government department. Delegated law has the same power as other Australian law and may be disallowed by the Parliament. In this case, the opposition, Australian Greens and Nick Xenophon Team senators voted to disallow the regulation by 32 votes to 30.

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Cashless debit card

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The Parliament has passed a bill to expand the use of cashless debit cards for welfare payments, following a trial period of their use in certain regions across the nation. Under this system, welfare payments are put into the account of the person receiving the money, which is only accessible with the card. This is designed to ensure welfare payments are spent on important living costs such as food, clothing and housing, and reduce the risk of money being spent on drugs, alcohol or gambling.

Introducing the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card) Bill 2017 in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Human Services, the Hon Alan Tudge MP, said, ‘The cashless debit card is a world first in how it operates. The trials have been completed, an evaluation has been conducted, and it's been shown to work’. 

The minister advised the House that the timing and new locations to be covered by the card will be determined by delegated law, so ‘the government can work with individual communities to co-design … and tailor the program to suit that particular community's needs.’

Powering our future

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

A new report from the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Environment and Energy has examined the issues facing Australia’s electricity grid. According to the Chair of the Committee, Mr Andrew Broad MP, there are four key issues to be considered: ‘the security of the system, the reliability of the system in meeting customer demand, emissions reduction and affordability.’

The report was unanimous with all members of the committee—from government, opposition, and cross-bench—agreeing to the recommendations. As the Deputy Chair, Mr Pat Conroy MP, noted, ‘It's a rare issue that gets the member for Mallee, the member for Hughes, the member for Melbourne and me to agree on anything, and this report recognises that and represents that. I think it signals a way forward on the energy debate in this country.’

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Bill to improve online safety

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

Posting or threatening to post non-consensual, or unapproved, intimate images on social media would be banned, under a bill passed by the Senate. This includes the use of media such as email or text messaging, websites and peer-to-peer file-sharing services. The eSafety Commissioner would handle complaints and enforce a civil penalty system, in which penalties for individuals or corporations could be handed out.

Introducing the Enhancing Online Safety (Non-consensual Sharing of Intimate Images) Bill 2017, the Minister for Communications and Minister for the Arts, Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield, told the Senate, ‘The sharing of intimate images without consent is a major concern in the community. This bill sends a clear message to all Australians that the non-consensual sharing of intimate images is unacceptable in our society.’

The Senate amended the bill to include criminal offences for sharing of intimate images without consent.

The House of Representatives will now consider the bill.

Senator Molan’s first speech

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed senator for New South Wales, Senator Jim Molan, AO, DSC, emphasised the importance of leadership in an age of technology. ‘First, leadership is everything. Whenever we wanted to achieve real effects, even in this technology dominated world, we still turned to the best person.’ He spoke at length about his experience as a Major General in the Australian Defence Force and what he learned from his experiences of war and of peace-keeping.

Senator Molan acknowledged that his first priority is the people of New South Wales. He acknowledged former Senator Fiona Nash and Ms Hollie Hughes, whose ineligibility resulted in Senator Molan being chosen to represent New South Wales in the Senate. He ended his speech by dedicating his efforts in Parliament to Australia’s soldiers.

Condolences

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

The Parliament paid tribute to several people who died recently.

In farewelling the Hon Barry Cohen, AM, a former minister and long-time member of parliament, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, said Mr Cohen was ‘passionate, determined and keen to contribute to a new vision of society in the nation.’ The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, remembered Mr Cohen’s ‘life dedicated to others, spent in the service of Labor values.’

The Parliament also honoured Mr Michael Gordon, award-winning political journalist and long-standing member of the Parliament House press gallery. The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described Mr Gordon as ‘A great man, a good man, a great writer and mentor.’

The press gallery is made up of many journalists and related staff who work for newspapers, television, radio stations and other organisations that collect and publish information. The press gallery is influential because the journalists and media organisations are free to select the news and publish what they think is interesting and important. In paying tribute to Mr Gordon, the Prime Minister also said, ‘the role of the media and courageous journalists like Michael Gordon is as vital a part of our democracy as the work that we do here in this chamber.’

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Changes to student loans scheme

Sitting period 5 to 15 February

New repayment thresholds would apply for Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debts, with those thresholds linked to the consumer price index, under a bill introduced in the House of Representatives. Students would be required to begin repaying their HELP debt when they earn $45 000. In addition, a new loan limit of $150 000 for students taking medicine, dentistry and veterinary science courses would apply.

Introducing the Higher Education Support Legislation Amendment (Student Loan Sustainability) Bill 2018, the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, told the House, ‘These reforms ensure our high-quality higher education system can grow while meeting the global challenges it will increasingly face.’

The Senate has referred the bill to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee for inquiry and report by 16 March 2018.

Parliament House goes nuclear

19 January 2018

More than 400 Year 12 science students from around Australia got a taste of law-making in action when they visited Parliament House as part of the National Youth Science Forum in January.

Participating in an education program of committee hearings and chamber debates, the students took on the roles of members of parliament and witness groups, investigating the possibilities for nuclear power in Australia.

Providing an example of the strong links between the scientific community and the Parliament, the program gave students an insight into how the Parliament uses the committee system to gather information and make more informed decisions when making laws.

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Cabinet reshuffle

21 December 2017

The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, has announced his new Cabinet. In what is often called a reshuffle, the Prime Minister has assigned portfolios, or specific areas of responsibility, to members of the government.

The Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, has recently returned to the House of Representatives after a by-election in the electorate of New England. He has been assigned the portfolio of Infrastructure and Transport. This will make him responsible for, among other things, the Inland Rail project.

The Deputy Prime Minister’s former portfolio of Agriculture and Water has been given to the Hon David Littleproud MP, who has entered the ministry for the first time.

The Hon Christian Porter MP has taken over the role of Attorney-General from Senator the Hon George Brandis, who will go to London as Australia’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom. The Hon Peter Dutton MP, who was the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, has now taken charge of the new Ministry for Home Affairs. This portfolio is responsible for immigration, border protection, law enforcement, cybersecurity and domestic security.

Senator the Hon Bridget McKenzie, newly-elected Deputy Leader of The Nationals in the Senate, has joined the ministry as Minister for Rural Health, Sport, and Regional Communications.

In addition to her role as Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, the Hon Kelly O’Dwyer MP has replaced Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash as Minister for Women. Senator Cash’s role as Minister for Employment has now become Minister for Jobs and Innovation.

The Hon Dr John McVeigh MP has also entered the ministry for the first time as Minister for Regional Development, Territories and Local Government. Dr McVeigh was a minister in the Queensland Government from 2012 to 2015.

Ministers have been sworn-in to their new roles by the Governor-General at Government House in Canberra.

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Same-sex marriage bill passes Parliament

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

There were tears, smiles, hugs and rainbow flags on the floor of the House of Representatives when the same-sex marriage bill passed the Parliament. Campaigners in the public galleries stood and sang ‘We Are Australian’ after the Marriage Amendment (Definition and Religious Freedoms) Bill 2017 was read a final time. A number of amendments, or changes, to the bill were discussed in the Senate and the House as part of an extensive debate in each chamber. The bill had been introduced to Parliament after the announcement of the marriage law postal survey results, in which 61.6 per cent of respondents agreed the law should be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry.

Parliamentary proposal

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

During the debate on the same-sex marriage bill, Mr Tim Wilson MP, the Member for Goldstein, asked his partner, who was seated in the public gallery, to marry him. Mr Wilson said, ‘with the indulgence of the Speaker, the person I have to thank most is my partner, Ryan. You've had to tolerate more than most because you had to put up with me...So there's only one thing left to do: Ryan Patrick Bolger, will you marry me?’

The Deputy Speaker, Mr Rob Mitchell MP, noted for the Hansard record that the answer was ‘a resounding yes.’ This is the first time a marriage proposal has been made from the floor of the Australian Parliament.

Youngest senator gives first speech

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed Western Australian Senator Jordan Steele-John noted that, ‘as the youngest person ever to be elected to the Senate and one of the few people with a disability to ever enter the federal parliament, I think it's safe to say that my presence here in this chamber is a rather radical departure from the norm.’

In preparing his speech, Senator Steele-John said he had used social media to reach out to the people he represented, asking, ‘If you could say anything to the people in this place what would you say?’ He shared a number of the responses in his speech, highlighting issues including the Uluru statement, climate change, economic inequality, and the rights of refugees.

Senator Steele-John closed by thanking his family and stating, ‘the challenges before us now are profound. But I sit here tonight brimming with the belief that we can and will meet those challenges together.’

NDIS safeguards put in place

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

The Parliament has passed a bill to establish the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission, which will set up and oversee national safeguards for all NDIS participants. The commission will: 

  • register NDIS service providers
  • respond to complaints of abuse or neglect of participants
  • lead the way in stopping practices that restrict rights or freedoms of people with disabilities
  • lead the design for national NDIS worker screening.

The bill was the result of recommendations from several recent inquiries and reports calling for nationally consistent rules in providing disability services.                                                                  

Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme Amendment (Quality and Safeguards Commission and Other Measures) Bill 2017, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Christian Porter MP, told the House of Representatives, ‘The bill seeks to balance appropriate protections that meet governments' duty of care obligations, with enabling participants to take reasonable risks in pursuit of their goals. The commission will support a strong and viable market for disability services that offers people with disability genuine choice and control.’

Committee investigates low survival rate cancers

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

The National Health and Medical Research Council should identify low survival rate cancers as a National Health Priority Area in 2018-19. In addition, the Australian Government should improve access to international clinical trials for low survival rate cancer patients and lead the way in ensuring that young people moving from paediatric to adult cancer treatments receive continuous quality care. These are among many recommendations in a wide-ranging and unanimous report from the Senate Select Committee into Funding for Research into Cancers with Low Survival Rates.

Presenting the report in the Senate, Senator Catryna Bilyk said, ‘We heard from cancer patients, their loved ones, carers, nurses and doctors. Patients who may not have much time left used their precious time to tell us of their experience. We heard from the parents of small children who were bravely fighting brain cancers and other low survival cancers, and we heard from the parents of children for whom, sadly, the fight was already over… On behalf of the committee, I would like to thank each and every one of the 117 witnesses who appeared before us. I thank you for your bravery, for your honesty, for your vision and hope, and for giving up your very precious time. The personal experiences of patients, their parents and children and their carers have been invaluable, and sharing your stories could not have been easy.’

Senator required to attend and explain in chamber

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

The Senate agreed to a motion put forward by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, Senator the Hon George Brandis, requiring Senator Sam Dastyari to appear before the Senate and address media reports about his interaction with Mr Huang Xian-gmo, a Chinese businessperson. Senator Dastyari attended the chamber and made a statement.

Senator Patrick’s first speech

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

In his first speech to the Senate, Senator Rex Patrick reflected on public perceptions of the Senate, quoting former Prime Minister Paul Keating’s summary of the chamber as ‘unrepresentative swill’.

Senator Patrick noted that while he respected Mr Keating, he hoped to counter these misconceptions, and spoke about the role and powers of the Senate in legislating and in holding the government to account. He listed oversight of intelligence agencies, environmentally sustainable power supplies, the Murray-Darling river system and representing the people of South Australia as being among his priorities.

Senator Patrick concluded by saying, ‘May we succeed in achieving a parliament that is truly representative of the people. And, if anyone ever says that the Senate is unrepresentative, then we can all say, “Pigs to that.”’

Government responds to committee report on dementia patients

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

The government has responded to recommendations made by the Senate Community Affairs References Committee related to an inquiry into younger and older Australians living with dementia. 

The report contained many recommendations, including that the government: 

  • work with service providers to develop guidelines for the use of restraints in residential facilities
  • explore ways to improve respite services for dementia patients in rural and remote areas
  • review respite facilities for younger-onset dementia patients.

The government responded to each recommendation in turn, stating its commitment to ‘the provision of quality services for people living with dementia, their families and carers, as well as research into the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of dementia.’

Senator Bartlett’s second first speech

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

Senator Andrew Bartlett’s first speech to the Senate was in 1997, when he was elected as a senator for Queensland as a member of the Australian Democrats. He is now representing Queensland as a member of the Australian Greens.

Senator Bartlett began his ‘second’ first speech by acknowledging the traditional owners of the land, both in Canberra and Queensland and noted that, ‘the greatest failing of Australian parliaments and our political system has undoubtedly been, and continues to be, this inability to deliver justice, equality and proper recognition to the First Australians.’

In addition to mental health, Senator Bartlett spoke about community media, income inequality, investment in renewable energy and banning corporate donations as issues of concern.

He concluded by saying, ‘It is time for a new style of politics that puts people back at the heart of decision-making and works for a future for all of us. I commit to working to that end, whether it be inside or outside the parliament, and supporting all those movements in the community which seek to do the same.’

Parliament House honey harvest

Sitting period 27 November to 7 December

Parliament House has celebrated its first honey harvest from its own beehives. The President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Scott Ryan, launched the celebration with the Department of Parliamentary Services, Aurecon and the ANU Apiculture Society, who together manage three bee hives at Parliament House. The Parliament House gardens have been home to thousands of honey bees as part of the fight against the global decline in bees. While the bee hives have produced honey, their main purpose has been to highlight how bees are critical to our food supply. A 2014 parliamentary report underlined how bees – through their role in the pollination process – are vital to food security, the environment, and the agriculture and horticulture industries.

New senators join Parliament

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

Following the High Court’s decision that a number of senators were found to be ineligible to be in Parliament as a result of their dual citizenship, three new senators were sworn-in to Parliament by the Governor-General, His Excellency General the Hon Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd):

  • Mr Fraser Anning was sworn-in as a senator for Queensland, replacing former Senator Malcolm Roberts.
  • Mr Andrew Bartlett was sworn-in as a senator for Queensland, replacing former Senator Larissa Waters.
  • Mr Jordan Steele-John was sworn-in as a senator for Western Australia, replacing former Senator Scott Ludlam.

Senator Steele-John, at the age of 23, is Australia’s youngest ever senator.

Mr Rex Patrick was also sworn-in as a senator for South Australia, replacing former Senator Nick Xenophon who resigned to contest the 2018 South Australian state election. In cases where a Senate vacancy is caused by the resignation of a senator, section 15 of the Australian Constitution directs that the new senator is appointed by the parliament in the state from which the original senator was chosen.

Senate appoints new President

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

Senator the Hon Scott Ryan has been elected as the new President of the Senate. This followed the resignation of former Senator the Hon Stephen Parry, as a result of his dual citizenship. A ballot was held for the President’s position, between Senator Ryan (Liberal Party of Australia) and Senator Peter Whish-Wilson (Australian Greens), with Senator Ryan winning the ballot 53-11.

Senator Ryan, at age 44, is the youngest ever President of the Senate.

Bennelong by-election

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

A House of Representatives by-election will be held in the electorate of Bennelong, in Sydney, following the resignation of Mr John Alexander as the sitting member. Mr Alexander resigned as a result of his dual citizenship.

The by-election will be held on 16 December.

Marriage law postal survey results announced

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) announced the results of the postal survey that asked Australians eligible to vote the question ‘Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?’

The ABS received responses from 79.5 per cent of voters, or nearly 8 out of 10 eligible Australians, with 61.6 per cent, or         7 817 247, voters in favour of changing the law and 38.4 per cent, or 4 873 987, voters against changing the law.

All states and territories recorded a majority ‘yes’ vote, with 133 of the 150 House of Representatives electorates recording a majority ‘yes’ vote and 17 recording a majority ‘no’ vote.

Across the nation, 81.6 per cent, or 6 644 192, eligible females and 77.3 per cent, or 5 980 168, eligible males participated in the survey. Voters aged 70-74 recorded the highest response rate to the survey, with 89.6 per cent participating. The youngest voters, aged 18-19, participated at a rate of 78.2 per cent, the highest rate for any age group under the age of 45.

Same-sex marriage bill introduced

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

Following the announcement of the marriage law postal survey results, Senator Dean Smith introduced the Marriage Amendment (Definition and Religious Freedoms) Bill 2017 to the Senate.

The private senator’s bill seeks to amend, or change, the Marriage Act 1961 ‘to remove the restrictions that limit marriage in Australia to the union of a man and a woman. The bill will allow two people to marry in Australia, regardless of their sex or gender’. Foreign same-sex marriages would be recognised in Australia.

Religious ministers would be allowed to refuse to solemnise, or peform, same-sex marriages on religious grounds. A new category of religious marriage celebrant would be created, to allow such celebrants to also refuse to solemnise same-sex marriages on religious grounds. All other marriage celebrants – referred to as civil celebrants – would be required to perform same-sex marriage ceremonies.

Speaking on the postal survey and the bill, Senator Smith said ‘In many cases, Australians voted for someone they knew, and in just as many they voted for someone they didn't. The wonder of this result is that it brings together young and old, gay and straight, conservative and progressive, immigrant and Indigenous, in the most unifying Australian coalition…This bill advances the civic rights of all Australians and provides protection for religious institutions to continue to be guided by …[the] tenets of their own faith. Nothing in this bill takes away an existing right, nor does any of it diminish an existing civil freedom. The change proposed in this bill is not revolutionary; it is evolutionary.’

Condolence for former Governor-General

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

The Senate paid tribute to former Governor-General the Right Honourable Sir Ninian Martin Stephen, KG, AK, GCMG, GCVO, KBE, QC, who was Governor-General of Australia from 1982 to 1989.

The Leader of the Government in the Senate, Senator the Hon George Brandis, declared ‘the one consistent theme throughout [Sir Ninian’s] extraordinary career is the universally high regard in which he was held by those who had the pleasure of working with him. Several qualities shine out from these many accounts: his first-rate intellect and world-renowned charm, his wisdom and fairness, and, above all, his human warmth.’

The Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, Senator the Hon Penny Wong, said ‘in his journeys along multiple paths throughout his life—all 94 years of it—one can appreciate how fortunate so many have been to benefit from his dedicated and selfless service. His work was diverse, his contributions significant, his commitment to service manifest. Our country—indeed, the world—owes Sir Ninian Stephen a great debt.’

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Government responds to NDIS report

Sitting period 13 to 16 November

Federal, state and territory governments should work with national disability organisations to update building codes so housing is more accessible for people with disabilities. This is one of the recommendations of the Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) report on accommodation for people with disabilities.

The government responded to the committee's report and agreed with this and several other recommendations about housing affordability and livability.

High Court decides

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The High Court, sitting in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, has ruled on whether several members of parliament were ineligible to be elected to Parliament as a result of being dual citizens. Each case was referred to the High Court by the Parliament because section 44(i) of the Australian Constitution states that a candidate standing for election to the Australian Parliament must not be a dual citizen of another country.

The then Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, was found to be ineligible to be elected to the House of Representatives. This decision has triggered a by-election in the electorate of New England, to be held on 2 December. Mr Scott Ludlam, Senator the Hon Fiona Nash, Senator Malcolm Roberts and Ms Larissa Waters were also found ineligible. Each of these former senators will be replaced according to a count-back of votes from the last election. The High Court also ruled on the cases of Senator the Hon Matthew Canavan and Senator Nick Xenophon, who were found to be eligible members of parliament, though Senator Xenophon subsequently resigned his position.

Ministry changes

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

As a result of the High Court ruling on parliamentary eligibility, a reshuffle of the government ministry has occurred.

The Prime Minister will take on the responsibilities of former Deputy Prime Minister the Hon Barnaby Joyce as Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources. Former Senator the Hon Fiona Nash’s responsibility as Minister for Regional Communications will be undertaken by Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield, with the Hon Darren Chester MP taking responsibility for the rest of the former minister’s portfolios.

Senator the Hon Matthew Canavan was sworn back into Cabinet as Minister for Resources and Northern Australia. 

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Senate estimates

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

Sunday penalty rates, the same-sex marriage survey and ABC programming were among some of the issues covered by Senate committees during Supplementary Budget Estimates hearings.

Often known as ‘Senate estimates’, or simply ‘estimates’, the hearings form an important part of Parliament’s work in scrutinising, or closely examining, how government agencies are spending taxpayers’ money.

In estimates hearings, ministers and officials from government departments and authorities appear before one of eight Senate committees, and answer questions about where money has been (or will be) spent. Over a week of hearings, a diverse range of issues were discussed including:

  • special procedures put in place for the same-sex marriage survey
  • the planned closure of the Manus Island regional processing centre
  • the rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)
  • penalty rates and their impact on Sunday workers
  • current long term take-up rates for wireless broadband services
  • Australian Federal Police raids on the offices of the Australian Workers' Union
  • Australia’s seat on the UN Human Rights Council
  • planning for transition to NAPLAN online testing
  • processes for the prescription of medicinal cannabis
  • the Referendum Council’s call to change the Constitution to provide for an Indigenous voice to Parliament
  • design of the trial for drug testing of social welfare recipients
  • economic modelling for the National Energy Guarantee
  • ABC’s coverage of the World Para Athletics Championships in London
  • agreement between the Philippines and Australia for enhanced counter terrorism cooperation
  • training and qualifications of truck drivers.

Australian citizenship bill falls off Senate agenda

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Australian Citizenship Legislation Amendment (Strengthening the Requirements for Australian Citizenship and Other Measures) Bill 2017 has been discharged, or removed, from the Senate Notice Paper (the official document listing all business before the Senate for a particular sitting day).

The bill passed the House of Representatives on 14 August and was introduced in the Senate the following day. The Senate made an unusual order, or decision, to set a deadline by which the bill needed to be brought on for debate. The deadline lapsed before the government was able to agree on amendments, or changes, to the bill with opposition and crossbench senators.

The bill had aimed to set revised standards for Australian citizenship, including that people must live in Australia for four years before applying for citizenship, up from the current 12-month residency requirement. Applicants would have needed to demonstrate higher competency in English and show they had integrated into Australian society, for example by ensuring their children attend school and through participation in community groups. New citizens may also have been required to pledge allegiance to Australia and its people.

A report from the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee presented to the Senate in September recommended that the government make the standard of English required for citizenship clearer and that it introduce special provisions for people who are current permanent residents.

 

A fair and balanced ABC

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) would need to ensure its news services are ‘fair’ and ‘balanced’, under a bill introduced in the Senate. This requirement would amend, or change, the ABC’s Charter, which sets out its roles and responsibilities. The Charter already requires that the ABC’s news services are ‘accurate and impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism’.

Introducing the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Fair and Balanced) Bill 2017, the Minister for Communications and Minister for the Arts, Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield, said the change would ‘support and strengthen the ABC' s reputation for providing trustworthy and dependable news and information services, and ensure the organisation uphold the standards expected of it by the Australian public.’

The Minister also introduced a bill to ‘ensure the ABC continues to focus on and meet the diverse needs of rural and regional Australia’, with measures including the establishment of a Regional Advisory Council. Made up of members with strong connections to regional communities, the Council would work with the ABC on any changes to broadcasting services that would greatly affect regional Australia.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Rural and Regional Measures) Bill 2017 ‘will ensure that our primary national broadcaster retains and deepens its connection to communities in the bush’, the Minister told the Senate.

Shadow ministry changes

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, announced a minor reshuffle to the shadow ministry, as a result of Ms Kate Ellis’ announcement she will be resigning from Parliament at the next election.

Deputy Opposition Leader the Hon Tanya Plibersek MP will add Training to her existing roles as Shadow Minister for Education and Shadow Minister for Women. Senator the Hon Doug Cameron will be responsible for TAFE in addition to currently being Shadow Minister for Skills and Apprenticeships.

The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP joins the Shadow Cabinet as Shadow Minister for Early Childhood Education and Development, adding to her current role as Shadow Minister for Veterans’ Affairs.

The Hon Matt Thistlethwaite MP will take on the new role of Shadow Assistant Minister for an Australian Head of State, as well as his current role as Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury.

The shadow ministry will now total 31 people.

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Condolence for Dr Evelyn Scott AO

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Parliament paid tribute to Dr Evelyn Scott AO, an Indigenous rights activist, who died recently. Among other achievements, Dr Scott campaigned for the YES vote in the 1967 referendum. The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described her as ‘an extraordinary woman who helped shape modern Australia.’ The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, encouraged Australians to ‘commemorate her life in the most fitting way possible: by redoubling and renewing our efforts to achieve true and lasting reconciliation.’

Australian content in broadcasting

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Australian television and music industry will be examined by the Senate Environment and Communications References Committee, as part of its inquiry into the ‘economic and cultural value of Australian content on broadcast, radio and streaming services’. The committee will also be assessing children’s television content.

The committee is accepting submissions until 31 January 2018, and is expected to report by 9 May 2018.

Border protection bill

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Parliament has passed a bill to amend, or change, the conditions under which information can be made public in relation to Australian Border Force operations. The Australian Border Force Amendment (Protected Information) Bill 2017 limits the existing definition of ‘protected information’ so that only specific kinds of information will be considered secret.

A report from the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee presented to the Senate in September recommended that the bill be passed.

Cannabis for patients

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

Medicinal cannabis would be available to seriously or terminally ill patients to relieve their suffering, under a private bill passed by the Senate. The Medicinal Cannabis Legislation Amendment (Securing Patient Access) Bill 2017 would ensure the supply of medicinal cannabis from Australian and overseas sources.

Introducing the bill, Australian Greens Senator Richard Di Natale said, ‘This bill is about securing access to medicinal cannabis for those Australian patients who need it most.’

The bill will now be considered by the House of Representatives.

A long walk home

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

Major Brendan Nottle from the Salvation Army walked more than 700 kilometres from Melbourne to Parliament House, Canberra, to raise awareness of homelessness in Australia. On arriving at Parliament House, Major Nottle met with several members of parliament including the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP. According to the organisation Homelessness Australia, there are more than 100 000 homeless Australians.

Parliament passes new rules for media ownership

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The Parliament has passed the Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, which includes major changes to the rules governing media ownership in Australia.

The House of Representatives agreed to Senate amendments, or changes, to:

  • introduce a $60 million fund to support the development of small and independent publishers;
  • employ more journalists;
  • set up an Australian Competition and Consumer Commission inquiry into the operation of major social media platforms such as Google and Facebook.

Irish delegation visits Parliament House

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

A delegation from the Republic of Ireland, including the Irish President, His Excellency Mr Michael Higgins, visited Parliament House. Mr Higgins is the first Irish head of state to visit Australia in 20 years. The Irish President met with the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, to discuss the historical links between Australia and Ireland, and current European concerns.

Senator Brockman’s first speech

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed Western Australian Senator Slade Brockman acknowledged ‘it is an honour to serve the people of Australia in the Senate.’

Coming from a farming background, he talked about the influence of his family on his values and on his decision to become a senator. He also acknowledged a number of friends including current and past members of parliament.

Senator Brockman listed telecommunications, biotechnology, and GST-sharing arrangements as some of the issues he intends to focus on in the Senate.

Super way to buy a first home

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The House of Representatives has passed a bill to allow people to use their superannuation to buy a first home. The Treasury Laws Amendment (Reducing Pressure on Housing Affordability Measures No. 1) Bill 2017 would make changes to 10 existing Acts, or laws, to enable first home buyers to make extra contributions to their superannuation and to later use that money to buy a home.

The changes would also allow individuals who are 65 or over to put the proceeds of selling their home into their superannuation fund.        

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Assistant Minister to the Treasurer, the Hon Michael Sukkar MP, explained that, ‘difficulty saving a deposit is a key barrier to getting into the [housing] market’ and that the changes ‘will help Australians boost their savings for their first home by allowing them to build a deposit inside superannuation.’

The opposition disagreed with the bill, moving an amendment which said the bill ‘will do nothing to address housing affordability but will instead work to undermine Australia’s world class superannuation system.’

The bill will now be considered by the Senate.

Girls take over Parliament

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

A career in politics was in the sights of 17 young women who took the place of members of parliament for a day, to gain experience and insight into political life. Plan International hosted the annual program in Parliament House to celebrate International Day of the Girl and highlight the need to encourage and enable girls to take up leadership roles in many sectors, including politics.

Plan International also released the She Can Lead report, in which 45 per cent of young women aged 15-25 felt there were not enough opportunities for women in politics and 35 per cent felt their gender was a barrier to their involvement.

The Senate took note of the program and called on all members of parliament to commit to supporting young women’s goals and contributions to public life.

More information

National anticorruption watchdog proposed

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

A national anticorruption watchdog, with the power to investigate allegations of corruption at the federal level, would be established by a bill introduced in the House of Representatives by Mr Adam Bandt MP, the Member for Melbourne. The National Integrity Commission (NIC) would be created to work with two other agencies: the existing Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, and a new Independent Parliamentary Advisor. The NIC would be similar to the states’ Independent Commissions Against Corruption (ICAC).

In introducing the bill, Mr Bandt said, ‘we need a well-resourced anticorruption watchdog with teeth, and that’s what this bill will provide.’

The bill is supported by Independent, Mr Andrew Wilkie MP, the Member for Denison, who will speak on it later.

The constant battle

Sitting period 16 to 26 October

The government has accepted the recommendations of the Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee’s report on the inquiry into suicide by veterans and ex-service personnel.

 The report noted that in some cases, the support and resources supplied by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs were inadequate to meet the needs of returned service men and women.

 In responding to the report, the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said, ‘Please remember, help is available. Help can make a difference. If you, your family, or friends are worried about how you are coping or feeling, please reach out.’

The Parliament recognises this topic could be distressing for some people. Those seeking support or information about suicide prevention are able to contact a number of organisations, including:

  • Lifeline on 13 11 14
  • the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service on 1800 011 046
  • MensLine on 1300 78 99 78.

New rules for media ownership

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The Senate has passed a bill that includes major changes to the rules governing media ownership in Australia.

The Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017 ends the 'two-out-of-three cross-media control rule' that stops media companies controlling television, radio and newspapers in the same area of the country. The '75 per cent audience reach' rule – which prevented media companies from controlling television broadcasting licences with a combined reach of more than 75 per cent of Australia’s population – will also be abolished.

The opposition and the Australian Greens did not support the bill; however, the government was able to gain the support of some on the Senate crossbench through extensive negotiation on a number of amendments, or changes, to the bill.

These included the introduction of a $60 million fund to support the development of small and independent publishers and to employ more journalists. An Australian Competition and Consumer Commission inquiry into the operation of major social media platforms such as Google and Facebook will also be established.

The House of Representatives (which had passed the original bill in August) will now consider the Senate's amendments.

Changes to funding for higher education

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The House of Representatives has passed a wide-ranging bill to reform, or change, the ways in which the government, taxpayers and students contribute to the costs of higher education in Australia. The Higher Education Support Legislation Amendment (A More Sustainable, Responsive and Transparent Higher Education System) Bill 2017 includes a change to the repayment thresholds on HELP loans (which assist students cover the costs of higher education), linking them in future to the Consumer Price Index. Students would also be encouraged to undertake work experience in their chosen industry, which would count towards their course.

Speaking on the bill, the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, said, ‘These reforms ensure our high quality higher education system can grow while meeting the global challenges it will increasingly face.’

High Court to determine eligibility of members of parliament

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The High Court, sitting in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, has announced it will meet on October 10-12 to determine whether several members of parliament were ineligible to be elected to Parliament as a result of being dual citizens.

Under section 44(i) of the Australian Constitution, a person ‘shall be incapable of being chosen or of sitting as a senator or a member of the House of Representatives’ if they are a ‘subject or a citizen of a foreign power.’

Epic walk ends at Parliament House

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Clinton Pryor, a Wajuk, Balardung, Kija and Yulparitja man from Western Australia, walked almost 6000 kilometres from Perth to Parliament House in Canberra.

Seeking to raise awareness of Indigenous issues, Mr Pryor met several members of parliament, including the Hon Linda Burney MP, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, Senator Patrick Dodson, the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, and the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP.

Private member’s bill to increase renewable energy

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

A bill to expand the renewable energy target – and increase it on an annual basis between 2021 and 2030 – has been introduced in the House of Representatives.

Presenting the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment (Continuing the Energy Transition) Bill 2017, Mr Adam Bandt, the Member for Melbourne, said, ‘Recharging the renewable energy target is the single most important action that this parliament could take to invigorate investment in energy and drive down electricity prices and drive down pollution.’

High Court rules on same-sex marriage postal survey

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Following the announcement of a postal survey on same-sex marriage, the High Court met in Melbourne to consider legal cases seeking to stop the survey going ahead.

In the first case, it was argued the government could not spend money on the survey without passing a law; the second case argued the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) did not have the authority to collect the information being sought through the survey.

The full bench of the High Court unanimously, or with agreement of all seven judges, dismissed both cases, ruling the survey could proceed and be administered by the ABS.

Safeguards introduced for marriage law survey

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The Parliament has passed a bill to put safeguards in place to promote ‘proper and respectful public comments’ during the same-sex marriage postal survey. The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017 includes penalties for bribery or threats, and for publishing misleading or deceptive information.

Introducing the bill, the Minister for Finance and Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate, Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann, said the bill would ‘promote the transparency and accountability of those making public comments in relation to the question in the marriage law survey.’

The bill passed both houses of Parliament and received Royal Assent from the Governor-General within six hours.

Report explores extent of modern slavery

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade tabled an interim report in the Senate on modern slavery and global supply chains. The interim report makes a number of recommendations, including requiring major Australian companies to report on how they are combatting modern slavery in their supply chains, and the appointment of an Anti-Slavery Commissioner.

Speaking about the report, Senator Lisa Singh said, ‘No business wants to have slavery in its supply chain, but, currently, consumers and businesses are left in the dark about it.’ The committee’s inquiry into modern slavery is ongoing.

Bill to change social services payments

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The government has proposed reforms which it says would simplify payments to working-age Australians through the social services system. The Social Services Legislation Amendment (Welfare Reform) Bill 2017 would combine a number of welfare payments, including Newstart, sickness, and bereavement allowances, into a single jobseeker payment. It would also introduce a cashless welfare card, and trial measures to drug test jobseekers and encourage those with substance abuse issues to seek treatment.

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said the bill would ‘make the income support system stronger and more sustainable over the long term.’

The bill has been agreed to in the House of Representatives and will now be considered by the Senate.

Committee to investigate cyberbullying

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The adequacy of cyberbullying laws – and the practices of social media platforms to prevent cyberbullying – will be investigated in a new inquiry by the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee.

The inquiry will consider the effectiveness of existing laws, policies and other measures in place to prevent and address cyberbulling, particularly between school children and young people.

The committee is accepting submissions until 13 October 2017, and is expected to report by 29 November 2017.

Ensuring mobile phone service in bushfire zones

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Telecommunications companies would be required to provide emergency power to mobile phone towers in high bushfire risk areas, under a private member’s bill before the House of Representatives.

Introducing the Telecommunication Amendment (Guaranteeing Mobile Phone Service in Bushfire Zones) Bill 2017, Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP, the Member for Mayo, said, ‘This is a simple protective measure for regional communities in Australia and the higher risk bushfire areas.’

The bill was also supported by Ms Cathy McGowan MP, the Member for Indi, who told the House, ‘This is an example of really effective action by Independents in this parliament.’

Bill to protect vulnerable workers

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The Parliament has passed a bill to protect vulnerable workers from employers who might exploit them. The Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Vulnerable Workers) Bill 2017 introduces higher penalties against employers who deliberately underpay workers or demand wages back from employees.

Holding companies that issue franchises (licences to operate and sell a product from the holding company) will be held more responsible for the conduct of their franchises in certain circumstances. The Fair Work Ombudsman will advise businesses about their responsibilities, depending on their particular set-up and the operation of their businesses. The Ombudsman will also be given stronger powers to collect evidence about deliberate breaches of workplace laws.

Introducing the bill in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the Hon Peter Dutton MP, said ‘The development of this bill has been informed by evidence from numerous reports and inquiries as well as extensive consultation with community, employer and employee representatives.’

House of Representatives electorates to increase

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) has announced that the number of electorates, or seats, in the House of Representatives will increase from 150 to 151 at the next federal election.

Seats in the House of Representatives are determined on the population of Australia’s states and territories, with each seat representing approximately the same number of people. Under the new arrangements, each seat will represent approximately 165 000 Australians.

As a result of changes in population across the nation, the ACT and Victoria will each be entitled to an additional seat, while South Australia will lose a seat.

A redistribution of federal electorate boundaries, based on official population numbers published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, will occur as a result of the changes to seat numbers. The AEC will decide on these boundaries and the naming of electorates after consulting with the public.

Inquiry into counselling services for domestic violence victims

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Counselling services for victims of domestic violence are the focus of a new Senate committee inquiry. The Senate Finance and Public Administration Committee will investigate the adequacy of funding for counselling services. The inquiry is accepting submissions until 6 October 2017 and is expected to report by 15 November 2017.

Compensation for military veterans

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Australian Defence Force members and former members who served prior to 1 July 2004 would have compensation, or benefits, set up in a separate government scheme, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Legislation Amendment (Defence Force) Bill 2016 would give the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs responsibility for running a ‘military specific’ scheme.

The new law would be identical to the existing Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRCA), with eligibility and benefits the same as the SRCA.

The bill ‘is a foundational step towards broader reform being undertaken by the Department of Veterans' Affairs to significantly improve services for veterans and their families by re-engineering DVA business processes’, the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, told the House of Representatives.

Authorisation required for election communications

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Election communications using certain modern technologies, including ‘robocalls and bulk SMS messages’, will require authorisation, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Electoral and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2017 addresses recommendations made by the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters (made up of members of both houses of Parliament) who inquired into the 2016 federal election.

Three categories of communication will need authorisation:

  • All paid advertising.
  • Certain communications from political parties, candidates and donors.
  • Particular printed material, including leaflets, flyers and how-to vote cards.

These authorisations will also tell voters the name of the political party behind the communication.

‘There is a strong public interest in ensuring voters are aware of who is communicating with them without adversely impacting public debate’, the Minister for the Environment and Energy, the Hon Josh Frydenberg MP, told the House. ‘This bill supports free and informed voting at elections, an object that is essential to Australia's system of representative democracy.’

Private senator’s bill to increase staffing for aged care

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Senator Derryn Hinch has introduced a bill into the Senate to establish a ratio of skilled staff to patients in aged care residential facilities. Under the proposal, the Department of Health would work with the aged care sector to calculate a ratio that takes into account patients with low or high needs, day and night shifts, and different population areas.

Introducing the Aged Care Amendment (Ratio of Skilled Staff to Care Recipients) Bill 2017, Senator Hinch said ‘The passage of this Bill would be an important step in moving towards an aged care system that is more focussed on the protection of the elderly than on profit margins of aged care facilities.’

Defence training facilities in rural communities

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

The impact of Defence training activities and facilities on rural and regional communities was investigated by the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade. The committee report makes several recommendations relating to the way in which the Australian Defence Force communicates with local communities when operating in rural and regional areas.

Bill to ban importation of flammable building cladding

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Senator Nick Xenophon has introduced a private senator’s bill to ban the importation of a flammable building cladding. The Customs Amendment (Safer Cladding) Bill 2017 would ban polyethylene (PE) core aluminium composite panels (ACPs), which ‘are so hazardous that in the event of a fire, one kilogram of polyethylene will release the same amount of energy as one and a half litres of burning petrol.’

Introducing the bill for Senator Xenophon, Senator Skye Kakoschke-Moore told the Senate ‘a ban on importation is necessary to prevent any disasters such as the Grenfell Tower tragedy occurring in Australia.’

Commission of Inquiry releases Murphy papers

Sitting period 4 to 14 September

Top secret papers of the Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry into the conduct of High Court Justice Lionel Murphy have been made public after 30 years.

The inquiry into the alleged misconduct of Justice Murphy, which included suspected bribery, sought to establish whether Justice Murphy’s conduct was ‘proved misbehaviour’ – a reason to remove a High Court Justice under the rules of the Australian Constitution.

The inquiry was suspended in 1986 after Justice Murphy was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

The records of the inquiry were tabled in the Senate and the House of Representatives under the authority of the Presiding Officers. In tabling the papers, the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Stephen Parry, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Hon Tony Smith MP, both noted that while it was important to ‘recognise that the records of the commission reflect an incomplete process’ there was a ‘legitimate historical interest’ in the issue.

Motion to reintroduce same-sex marriage plebiscite bill defeated

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The government introduced a motion to restore the Plebiscite (Same-Sex Marriage) Bill 2016 to the Senate Notice Paper, which would have allowed the bill to be brought back on for debate. The bill, originally defeated in the Senate in November last year, would have set up a plebiscite, or national vote, on the question ‘Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?’ The motion was defeated, with votes tied at 31-31.

The government has announced that a voluntary postal survey will be held to determine the issue. This is subject to a challenge in the High Court.

Eligibility of members of parliament

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Parliament has referred the cases of several members of parliament to the High Court, sitting in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, to decide on their eligibility to be in Parliament.  Each case has been referred because section 44(i) of the Australian Constitution states that a candidate standing for election to the Australian Parliament must not hold dual citizenship with another country.

Corrupt workplace payments outlawed

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Parliament has passed a bill to ban corrupt secret payments between trade unions and employers. Speaking on the introduction of the Fair Work Amendment (Corrupting Benefits) Bill 2017 in the House of Representatives, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, declared that the government was ‘committed to ending these secret deals between unions and employers, and… to putting the interests of workers first.’

The bill requires employers and trade unions to disclose, or reveal, any financial benefits they may gain under an enterprise agreement before it is put to employees to vote on.  Criminal penalties will also apply to employers or trade unions for making payments with the intention to corrupt.

Proposed changes to broadcasting rules

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The operation of broadcasting services across the country would change, under a wide-ranging bill passed by the House of Representatives.  The Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017 includes an end to the 'two-out-of-three cross-media control rule' that stops media companies controlling television, radio and newspapers in the same area of the country. The '75 per cent audience reach' rule – banning media companies from controlling television broadcasting licences with a combined reach of more than 75 per cent of the population – would be abolished.

 Anti-siphoning rules would also be reformed. These rules were originally set up in 1994, to ensure viewers would still have the chance to watch major sporting and other national events on free-to-air television, rather than only on pay TV channels.  The ‘multichannelling rule’ that prevented free-to-air broadcasters from showing events first, or only, on their digital channels, at a time when fewer viewers had access to digital television, would also be removed by the bill.

Introducing the bill, the Minister for Urban Infrastructure, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, told the House that the government was focused on promoting media diversity and strength, saying ‘The measures contained in this bill represent a comprehensive set of reforms. They give our traditional media operators the flexibility to grow and adapt in the changing media landscape, invest in their businesses and in Australian content, and better compete with online providers.’

Improving childhood immunisation program

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

Healthcare professionals other than general practitioners will be able to exempt, or excuse, children with complex medical conditions from immunisation, under a bill passed by the Parliament. Introducing the Australian Immunisation Register and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2017 in March, the Minister for Health, the Hon Greg Hunt MP confirmed that, ‘paediatricians, public health physicians, infectious diseases physicians and clinical immunologists’ would also be able to assess children as medically exempt.  

The minister restated the government’s commitment to improving the rates of childhood immunisation, declaring that ‘Allowing these specialists to notify medical exemption to the Australian Immunisation Register will maintain and enhance the integrity of the No Jab, No Pay policy because it ensures that the most qualified clinicians are able to make this assessment. That is right, proper, sensible and an important advancement.’

The bill also makes it clear that the Australian Immunisation Register can only accept immunisation information from recognised immunisation providers. This will stop members of the public providing incorrect information to the register.

Committee investigating modern slavery

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade continued its inquiry into combatting modern slavery, holding public hearings in Sydney and Melbourne over the winter parliamentary break.

It is estimated that more than 45 million people around the world are victims of some type of modern slavery, including human trafficking, forced labour, debt bondage, and forced marriage.

The Committee aims to be able to recommend whether Australia should adopt national anti-slavery laws. The Criminal Code already contains a number of anti-slavery provisions.

‘The appalling practice of modern slavery is a scourge that regrettably continues to affect millions of people around the world, including in Australia,’ said Sub-Committee Chair, Mr Chris Crewther MP.

The Attorney-General’s Department is also seeking submissions for a public consultation on this issue. The department is proposing a requirement for corporations to report how they are addressing modern slavery in their supply chains. Submissions for this consultation are open until 20 October 2017.

Senator Georgiou’s first speech

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

In his first speech to the Senate, newly appointed Western Australian Senator Peter Georgiou acknowledged that it is a privilege to serve his nation and to represent the people of his state.

As a first generation Australian, he spoke about the country as ‘the land of opportunity’ where his parents came in search of ‘the great Australian dream.’

Senator Georgiou listed GST distribution, apprenticeships, a strong banking sector, and domestic violence as some of the issues he intends to focus on in the Senate.

Border protection bill

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The government has introduced a bill in the House of Representatives to amend, or change, the conditions under which information can be made public in relation to Australian Border Force operations.

The Australian Border Force Act 2015 (ABF Act) made ‘the unauthorised making of a record or disclosure of information…punishable by imprisonment for two years.’ The Australian Border Force Amendment (Protected Information) Bill 2017 amends the ABF Act by making it clear that only certain types of information need to be protected. These include information relating to ‘security, defence and international relations…[and] protection of public health and safety’. The provisions of the bill will be applied retrospectively, which means they will be backdated to the date the ABF Act became law.

Introducing the bill into the House, the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the Hon Peter Dutton MP, said ‘The bill provides assurances for the Australian public, business, government and foreign partners that sensitive information provided to my department will be appropriately protected, without unnecessarily restricting informed public debate… It illustrates the fine balance that must be struck in protecting sensitive information while upholding a commitment to open and accountable government.’

The Senate has referred the bill to its Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee, with a report due to be presented to the Senate by 12 September.

Protections for small business

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Senate has passed a private senator’s bill to help small businesses if they take big businesses to court over anti-competitive behaviour. Introducing the Competition and Consumer Legislation Amendment (Small Business Access to Justice) Bill 2017 in February, the Manager of Opposition Business in the Senate, Senator Katy Gallagher, said ‘Too many smaller businesses are having to make a decision about calling out bad conduct based on the resources they can invest in the pursuit of a court ruling, rather than on the merits of their case.’

Under the bill, a small business would be able to request a 'no adverse cost order'. This order would waive, or set aside, their obligation to pay the court costs of another business they are taking to court, if the court decides that their court case is in the public interest and has a reasonable chance of success.

The bill will now be considered by the House of Representatives; however it is unlikely to pass as the government, which has a majority in the House, is opposed to it.

Committee to investigate fake art

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs will hold an inquiry into inauthentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ‘style’ art and craft products.

The Committee Chair, Ms Melissa Price MP, said ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and communities rely on revenue obtained through the sale of hand-made and culturally authentic products. The aims of the inquiry are to identify ways to prevent the exploitation and misuse of Indigenous culture.’

The Committee is accepting submissions until Friday, 6 October 2017.

Restrictions on interactive gambling

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

Online gambling services will be subject to stricter controls, as part of a bill passed by the Parliament. The Interactive Gambling Amendment Bill 2016 was introduced into Parliament as the first stage of the government’s response to the Review of Illegal Offshore Wagering. The bill will set up consumer protections to minimise problem gambling and stop overseas operators from offering Australians illegal online gambling services.

Measures in the bill include a ban on ‘click-to-call’ betting, which allows people to place many bets in a short space of time, and can lead to problem gambling.  In addition, anyone wanting to set up interactive gambling services must hold a licence under Australian state or territory law. The Australian Communications and Media Authority will be given the power to issue formal warnings and enforce civil penalties, or to refer more serious complaints to the Australian Federal Police.

Speaking on the bill in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Human Services, the Hon Alan Tudge MP, said ‘A combination of clearer laws, an active regulator and stronger enforcement measures will send a clear message to operators that Australia is serious about compliance of its gambling laws.’

Higher education sector reforms

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Parliament has passed the Legislation Amendment (Provider Integrity and Other Measures) Bill 2017 to make changes to the way the higher education sector operates. These changes include stricter regulation of providers of education services to international students and stronger testing for all providers applying to access FEE-HELP, which assists students with fee costs. Cold-calling to market student programs and charging unnecessary fees when students cancel enrolments will be banned. Providers will also need to assess students to ensure they are academically suitable to study before enrolment. Many of these changes reflect the reforms made to the vocational and education training sector passed by the Parliament last year.

‘The bill ensures that as we increase learning opportunities for overseas students and market opportunities for dedicated education providers, we also shut down opportunities for unscrupulous providers to harm the reputation of our education services’, the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, told the House.

Condolence motions

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Parliament paid tribute to several people who died recently, including Dr G Yunupingu, Indigenous multi-instrumentalist and singer; Mr Kunmanara Lester, Indigenous rights activist; Mr Les Murray, sports journalist; and Ms Betty Cuthbert, four-time Olympic gold-medal-winning sprinter.

Ms Linda Burney MP paid her respects to Dr G Yunupingu, noting that ‘he brought a first-Australian language to mainstream Australia.’

Senator Malarndirri McCarthy honoured Kunmanara Lester’s contribution, saying that he ‘dedicated his life to Aboriginal affairs and the betterment of our people’. She spoke of his many achievements, including the handback of Uluru to its traditional owners.

The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described Les Murray as ‘the face of soccer broadcasting in Australia for a generation of fans’ and credited him with popularising the world game in Australia.

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, paid tribute to Betty Cuthbert, noting the physical and financial hardships she had overcome and naming her ‘forever a golden girl.’

Proposed changes to ABC

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) would be required to ensure that at least 35 per cent of money it spends each financial year goes towards services for regional, rural or remote parts of Australia, under a private senator’s bill introduced in the Senate.

Introducing the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Regional Australia) Bill 2017, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Senator Brian Burston said ‘At present, the ABC spends just 17 per cent of its revenue for the benefit of people working outside the capital cities where 35 per cent of the Australian population resides… Restoring the balance between the city and the bush at the ABC is not just a matter of justice and equity…but also of recognising the unique contribution of the bush to Australian culture and values.’

Solomon Islands Prime Minister visits Parliament House

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The Australian Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, welcomed the Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, the Hon Mr Manasseh Damukana Sogavare MP, and his wife Madam Mrs Emmy Sogavare, to Parliament House.

In a media release, Mr Turnbull said ‘The visit by Prime Minister Sogavare is an important milestone following the conclusion of the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (RAMSI) – a 14-year partnership that restored peace and stability to the Solomon Islands.

‘Prime Minister Sogavare and I will discuss the new era ahead for our bilateral development, economic, and security partnership.’

During the visit, both Prime Ministers will witness the signing of a Bilateral Security Treaty.

Government responds to committee report on bicycle helmet laws

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

The government has responded to recommendations made by the Senate Economics References Committee related to an inquiry into the impacts of bicycle helmet laws.

It has been compulsory to wear a bike helmet in Australia since the early 1990s.

The report recommended that the government track whether helmets are effective in preventing injuries and whether having to wear a helmet encouraged or discouraged people from cycling.

The government responded that it has recently announced funding for the Australian Trauma Registry, which will gather information about severe injuries to cyclists on Australian roads.

The government also responded that ’there is strong evidence that bicycle helmets are effective in reducing serious head and neck injuries to cyclists.’

In addition to the committee’s recommendations, Senator David Leyonhjelm recommended that cyclists aged 16 years or over should not have to wear helmets when riding in parks, or on bike paths, footpaths, or roads where the speed limit is 50km per hour or less. The government does not support this recommendation.

Private senator’s bill to protect Australian Defence Force wages

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

Senator Jacqui Lambie has introduced a bill into the Senate which would link the pay of members of the Australian Defence Force to either parliamentarians’ pay or to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). If passed, the bill would mean that men and women serving in the Army, Navy or Air Force would receive pay increases in line with either inflation or pay increases for members of parliament, whichever is higher.

Senator Lambie described the bill as ‘reasonable and measured.’ She had previously introduced this same bill into the last Parliament, but the bill had lapsed when the 2016 federal election was called. The previous bill passed the Senate, but was not debated in the House of Representatives.

New senator sworn-in

Sitting period 8 to 17 August

Mr Slade Brockman was sworn-in as a senator for Western Australia. He is replacing Senator Chris Back, who has retired.

In cases where a Senate vacancy is caused by the retirement of a senator, section 15 of the Australian Constitution directs that the new senator is appointed by the parliament in the state from which the original senator was chosen.

Greens senators resign

21 July 2017

Greens Senators Scott Ludlam from Western Australia and Larissa Waters from Queensland have both resigned from the Senate. Their resignations follow separate announcements they are ineligible to sit in the Senate, according to section 44 of the Australian Constitution.

Section 44 covers the qualifications to be elected a senator, including those relating to Australian citizenship. This section states that a candidate standing for election to the Australian Parliament must not hold dual citizenship with another country. In addition to Australian citizenship, Mr Ludlam holds New Zealand citizenship and Ms Waters holds Canadian citizenship.

The Senate may refer the cases of the two senators to the High Court, sitting in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, to decide on the matter. 

Reforms to school funding

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

A six-hour debate – including a division vote by the Senate at 1.02am – will result in significant reform of schools funding in Australia following the passage of the Australian Education Amendment Bill 2017 through the Parliament.

Often referred to as ‘Gonski 2.0’, the bill was based on a review initially undertaken in 2010 by Sydney businessman, David Gonski AC, which made 41 recommendations for how Australian schools should be funded. Central to Mr Gonski’s review was the idea of funding schools based on need so every school student in Australia would have access to the same standard of education. Students who were disabled, Indigenous or from disadvantaged backgrounds, and schools that are small or located in remote areas, would receive additional ‘top up’ funding.

The opposition did not support the bill but several weeks of extensive negotiation enabled the government to gain the support of the Senate crossbench through a number of amendments, or changes, including:

  • delivering funding over six years, rather than 10
  • the introduction of a body to review how school funding is  allocated and monitor the way it is used
  • a $50 million transition package for Catholic and other non-government schools
  • the provision of additional funding to create a total package worth $23.5 billion.

The Minister for Education and Training, Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham, told the Senate he commended the work of the crossbench in amending the bill. ‘These are amendments that absolutely enhance the Turnbull government's reforms. They build upon them. They make them stronger. They will deliver greater support, and faster, to the schools who need it most’.

Although the Senate agreed to the amendments, the introduction of additional funding meant that the bill had to be returned to the House of Representatives, where it was passed in the early hours of Friday morning.

Update on national security

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

The Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, has urged the Parliament to support changes to citizenship requirements aimed at ensuring migrants embrace Australian values. 'We should make no apology for asking those who seek to join our Australian family to join us as Australian patriots,' he said.

Mr Turnbull made the comments in a national security update to the House of Representatives in which he outlined the steps the government is taking to 'stay ahead' of the terrorism threat. These include additional funding for law enforcement agencies, securing Australia's borders and a continuing contribution to the international fight against terrorism in the Middle East.

The Prime Minister flagged the government's intention to allow security agencies to decrypt the online communication of terrorist groups, saying 'the privacy of a terrorist can never be more important than public safety.'  As well, he said, the federal government is working with state and territory governments to develop a national strategy for protecting crowded places, for example sporting stadiums, major events and civic spaces.

Mr Turnbull said, 'My commitment and that of my government is never to rest as we do all within our power to keep Australians safe, secure and free.'

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, also made a statement in regard to national security.

Citizenship law strengthened

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

People applying for citizenship will be required to sign an Australian Values Statement which, among other things, states respect for the rule of law, freedom of religion and speech, and support for parliamentary democracy. This is one of the changes proposed by the government in its Australian Citizenship Legislation Amendment (Strengthening the Requirements for Australian Citizenship and Other Measures) Bill 2017.

Speaking in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the Hon Peter Dutton MP, said the Australian community expects people applying for citizenship to demonstrate allegiance to the country. This included a commitment 'to live in accordance with Australian laws and values, and be willing to integrate into and become contributing members of the Australian community,' he said.

Under the bill, people must have lived in Australia for four years before applying for citizenship, up from the current 12-month residency requirement. Applicants also need to demonstrate higher competency in English and show they have integrated into the Australian community, for example by ensuring their children attend school and through participation in community groups. New citizens may also be required to pledge allegiance to Australia and its people.

Mr Dutton said the changes will reinforce the integrity of the citizenship program and 'help maintain strong public support for migration and the value of Australian citizenship in what is an increasingly challenging national security environment and complex global security situation.'

Calls for government to act on pay gap

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

Australia's highly gender segregated workforce is a major contributor to the pay gap between men and women, with six in 10 Australians working in an industry dominated by one gender. This was among the findings made by the Senate Finance and Public Administration References Committee following an inquiry into 'Gender segregation in the workplace and its impact on women's economic equality.'

The committee called on the government to develop a plan to tackle the pay gap which has hovered between 15 and 20 per cent for the past 20 years. It recommended changes to both the Fair Work Act 2009 and the Fair Work Commission to help address the different rates of pay in industries often dominated by a particular gender.

This follows the finding that, on average, a woman working full-time in a female-dominated industry, earns nearly $40 000 less than a man in a male-dominated industry. The gap is particularly noticeable in occupations involving caring, such as childcare, in-home disability, aged care and education, where the nature of the work demands 'emotional labour'. These are 'essential skills' in the care sector, but 'are undervalued in the labour market,' Chair of the committee, Senator Jenny McAlister said.

In a dissenting report, government senators on the committee said the government is already taking significant steps to address pay inequity.

Fruit picking incentives for jobless

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

Newstart and Youth Allowance recipients will be given incentives to take up seasonal work such as picking and packing farm produce under a two-year trial agreed to by the Parliament, which also aims to help farmers facing a shortage of seasonal workers.

Under the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Seasonal Worker Incentives for Jobseekers) Bill 2017, people who have received Newstart or Youth Allowance payments continuously for three months will be able to earn up to $5000 as seasonal workers without losing any of their social security payment.

The Minister for Social Security, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said this will provide a strong incentive to participate in the trial, adding that the scheme offers 'a practical opportunity to build work experience and skills.'

Allowances of up to $300 a year will be available to participants in the trial to find work more than 120 kilometres from their home.

Senate passes banking inquiry bill

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

The Senate has passed a private senator's bill to set up a parliamentary inquiry into banking and financial services. Introducing the Banking and Financial Services Commission of Inquiry Bill 2017, Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson said given recent revelations of misconduct in the sector, the inquiry 'is needed to hold the banking and financial services sector to account.'

In the absence of the government holding a Royal Commission, the bill ensures 'the 45th Parliament does everything in its power to ensure that the banking and financial sector is acting in the best interest of its customers,' he said.

The inquiry would operate identically to a Royal Commission, but would report directly to the Parliament, rather than the government. The crossbench and opposition voted together to pass the bill in the Senate.

The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives; however it is unlikely to pass as the government, which has a majority in the House, is opposed to it.

Big banks to pay levy

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

The big banks will pay a levy, or tax, from July after the Parliament agreed to the Major Bank Levy Bill 2017. Banks with total liabilities, or commitments, of more than $100 billion will pay the levy which is expected to raise $6.2 billion over four years.

Introducing the bill in the Senate, the Minister for Finance, Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann, said the government is 'committed to ensuring that Australia's largest banks are held to account and make a fair additional contribution to the Australian community which they serve.'

The Parliament also passed a second bill, the Treasury Laws Amendment (Major Bank Levy) Bill 2017 which sets out how the levy will be calculated and collected.

Expanded role for eSafety commissioner

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

The role of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner will expand to cover online safety for all Australians, with a particular focus on women and older Australians, under a bill passed by the Parliament. In line with these changes, the commissioner will be renamed the eSafety Commissioner.

The changes included in the Enhancing Online Safety for Children Amendment Bill 2017 were triggered by a discussion between South Australian Senator Skye Kakoschke-Moore and the acting Children’s eSafety Commissioner during Senate Estimates last year. Senator Kakoschke-Moore suggested the title ‘Children’s eSafety Commissioner’ might discourage adults from seeking help from the commission.

Before agreeing to the bill, the Senate passed a motion noting that Australian laws have failed to keep up with the new ways technology might cause harm, particularly to women. It also called on the government to make it illegal to share intimate images without consent. This was based on a recommendation made by the Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee in its report on the phenomenon known as ‘revenge porn’.

Carly's Law passes Parliament

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

'Carly's Law', a bill aimed at protecting children from online predators, was passed by the Parliament. Under the Criminal Code Amendment (Protecting Minors Online) Bill 2017, people who lie about their age to minors online will be prosecuted, and  police will be given the power to intervene before online predators have a chance to act.

The bill was named after Carly Ryan, a 15-year-old who was murdered in 2007 by an online predator posing as a teenage boy. It was based on a private senator's bill introduced by South Australian Senator Nick Xenophon.

Speaking on the bill, Senator Xenophon praised the Parliament for coming together to pass Carly's Law. 'This is the parliament working at its best. This is what happens when we get together on a common cause for what I believe is, overwhelmingly, to the community benefit. This will make it more difficult for predators to do their evil. This will make it easier for the police to intervene,' he said.

Senator Xenophon said Sonya Ryan could have been consumed by grief and hatred but instead campaigned for this law, turning 'a most terrible event into a testament of love to her daughter' that would help save many lives and protect children from harm.

Government backbencher crosses floor

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

Mr George Christensen, the Member for Dawson, crossed the floor to support a proposed opposition amendment, or change, to a government bill on the workplace relations system. The amendment to the Fair Work Amendment (Repeal of 4 Yearly Reviews and Other Measures) Bill 2017 sought to protect Sunday penalty rates. It was narrowly defeated in the House of Representatives with 72 votes for and 73 against.

The bill was introduced in March by the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the Hon Peter Dutton MP. It includes measures to repeal, or cancel, the requirement for four-yearly reviews of modern awards which outline minimum pay rates and employment conditions, and to ensure the Fair Work Commission is accountable to the Parliament and the public.

Crossing the floor, or voting against your party, is rare. However, Mr Christensen said he took the step because the amendment was in line with a bill he had previously introduced – the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take-Home Pay of All Workers) Bill 2017 – in the House to protect Sunday penalty rates.

Senator Gichuhi's first speech

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

It was an honour and a privilege to serve the people of Australia, newly appointed South Australian Senator Lucy Gichuhi said in her first speech to the Senate. As the first black African-born senator in the history of Australia, Senator Gichuchi recalled her 'humble beginnings' in Kenya and spoke of her responsibility to protect the freedoms enjoyed by Australians.

'I may not have owned a pair of shoes yet, but while dreaming of my future potential I discovered that poverty came in many differential forms, shapes and sizes. Wearing shoes could mean that walking to school would be more comfortable, but soon I realised that true poverty was when a person is unable to freely choose their own destiny,' she said.

Senator Gichuchi listed balancing work and home life while raising children, aged care, education and welfare as some of the other issues she plans to focus on in the Senate.

Valedictory for Senator Back

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

In his final speech to the Senate, retiring Western Australian Senator Chris Back has urged members of parliament to 'put the country ahead of all else.'  Noting that 'there are some enormous challenges ahead of us in this country,' he said 'it is going to fall to the Senate, on behalf of the people of Australia, to step up to the plate.'

Among the Senate committee inquiries he was proud to be involved in, Senator Back nominated the inquiry into the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Amendment (Fair Protection for Firefighters) Bill 2011.  The bill helped ensure that fire fighters who develop certain cancers due to inhaling carcinogens at work are compensated. As a result of the inquiry, the list of cancers covered by the bill was increased from seven to thirteen. Senator Back said this law has become 'the benchmark for similar legislation throughout the provinces of Canada, the United States and Europe.'

A former veterinarian, Senator Back has served in the Senate since 2009 when he was chosen to fill a casual vacancy. He was re-elected in 2010 and 2016. His retirement creates a casual vacancy in the Senate for Western Australia. Under section 15 of the Constitution, the Western Australian Parliament will appoint a replacement for Senator Back who, like him, is a member of the Liberal Party of Australia.

Future cities

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

With Australia's population expected to double by 2075, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Infrastructure, Transport and Cities is conducting an inquiry into the Australian government's role in the development of cities.

It will examine city planning and sustainable urban development, focusing on how existing capital cities can adapt to larger populations, and how to develop new and existing regional centres.

Committee Chair, Mr John Alexander MP, said collaborative and flexible urban planning is essential to Australia's future. 'We need options for adapting infrastructure and services in existing cities to sustainably accommodate much larger populations. We also have to examine opportunities to develop new or existing regional centres,' Mr Alexander said.

The committee will accept written submissions until 31 July.

More mental health support for veterans and ADF

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

A broader range of free mental health support will be made available to veterans and Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel under a bill passed by the Parliament.

Speaking on the Veterans’ Affairs Legislation Amendment (Budget Measures) Bill 2017, the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, said that serving and former members of the defence force will no longer have to prove their mental health condition – including phobias, adjustment disorder and bi-polar disorder – is linked to their service before receiving support.

Noting the changes will mean veterans and ADF personnel can get immediate help, Mr Tehan said, ‘the earlier intervention and support is provided, the better the outcome for the individual.’ The bill also sets aside $9.8 million to pilot new approaches to suicide prevention for veterans.

Access to the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS) will be expanded to include partners, dependent or immediate family members. Former partners of ADF personnel will also be able to use the VVCS for up to five years after a couple has separated, or while co-parenting a child under the age of 18. 

Describing the VVCS as ‘a vital service that saves lives,’ the Minister said ‘the government ‘understands that partners, families and former partners of our veterans are an important part of the ex-service community and that they too are affected by military service.’

The bill also provides full free health care to Australian participants of the British Nuclear Tests and Australian veterans of the British Commonwealth Occupation Force. It introduces changes to make it easier for veterans to access disability payments and rehabilitation support.

Relief from Medicare levy for low-income earners

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

More low-income earners will be exempt, or freed, from paying the Medicare levy under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Treasury Laws Amendment (Medicare Levy and Medicare Levy Surcharge) Bill 2017 extends the income threshold, or the amount a person can earn, before they are required to pay the levy. 

Around one million people will benefit from the change, according to the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP. ‘The increase in the low-income thresholds means that some low-income individuals will be relieved from paying the Medicare levy. Other low-income individuals will also now pay less Medicare levy than they would if the thresholds were not increased,’ he said.

Women in parliament

Sitting period 13 to 22 June

Out of 226 members of the Australian Parliament, 75 are female. Since federation in 1901, 205 women have served in the Parliament. Their stories are told in Women in federal Parliament.

This compares with the UK Parliament, where a record 208 women were voted in at the recent general election, taking female representation in the House of Commons to 32 per cent. In the Australian Parliament women make up 33.2 per cent of elected representatives.

Senate estimates

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

Coral bleaching, broadband connections and the number of people calling Centrelink were among some of the issues covered by Senate committees during the 2017-18 Budget Estimates hearings.

Often known as ‘Senate estimates’, or simply ‘estimates’, the hearings form an important part of Parliament’s work in scrutinising, or closely examining, how government agencies are spending taxpayers’ money.

In estimates hearings, ministers and officials from government departments and authorities appear before one of eight Senate committees, and answer questions about where money has (or will be) spent. Over two weeks of hearings, a diverse range of issues were discussed including:

  • the extent of coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef
  • the number of callers to Centrelink over the past year
  • mechanical issues with a number of Australia’s warships
  • measures to prevent fraud in the Australian Taxation Office
  • waiting times for people seeking a visa or Australian citizenship
  • the number of homes unable to be connected to the National Broadband Network
  • whether a proposed levy on Australian banks would be passed on to consumers
  • the total cost of expanding the Snowy Hydro scheme
  • allowances and other entitlements for Australian diplomats.

Reconciliation Week - Indigenous milestones remembered

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

‘Milestones that helped our nation chart a course towards reconciliation and healing,’ is how the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described the 1967 referendum, the Mabo High Court decision and the ‘Bringing them home’ report. The Prime Minister was speaking in the House of Representatives during Reconciliation Week, which this year also marked the fiftieth anniversary of the referendum.

In the 1967 referendum, Australians voted overwhelmingly to change the Constitution so that for the first time, Indigenous Australians were counted in the national census, and the federal Parliament was given the power to make laws for all Indigenous Australians.

‘Fifty years ago, laws and regulations controlled where our First Australians could and could not move and what they could and could not do—lives limited, lives demeaned and lives diminished,’ Mr Turnbull said.

‘But fifty years ago our nation was given the opportunity to vote for change. And our nation did...The 1967 referendum had the highest 'yes' vote of any referendum before, or any since,’ he added.

Reconciliation Week also coincided with the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Mabo decision which overturned the doctrine of terra nullius, which held that before white settlement, Australia belonged to no one. As well, it marked twenty years since the release of ‘Bringing them Home’, the report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families.

We have come a long way since the referendum and the Mabo case, but we have not come far enough,’ Mr Turnbull acknowledged. He said his government is continuing to take steps to ensure Indigenous Australians are fully included in the economic and social life of the nation.

A number of elders who campaigned for the 1967 Referendum and family members of the plaintiffs in the 1992 Mabo High Court case were in the House to observe the speech.  The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, also acknowledged the significance of these events, saying ‘The 1967 referendum and the High Court's Mabo decision were triumphs for truth-telling and decency.’

Linda Burney grants leave

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

Under parliamentary rules, when a member of parliament wants to make a speech, such as the Prime Minister’s commemorating the 1967 referendum, they must seek leave, or permission, from the House of Representatives. Normally, the Manager of Opposition Business, the Hon Tony Burke MP, gives leave on behalf of the opposition. However, on this occasion it was Linda Burney, the Member for Barton and first Indigenous woman elected to the House of Representatives, who gave the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition permission to proceed.

As Mr Burke observed, ‘Linda herself was not counted in the Census until she was 10 years old and this referendum was passed. So the Prime Minister of Australia and the Leader of the Opposition were allowed to speak because a Wiradjuri woman who wasn’t counted in the Census as Australian until she had turned 10 stood up and said “leave is granted”.’

A celebration of Indigenous parliamentarians

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

An exhibition celebrating the contribution of Indigenous members of parliament opened at Parliament House as part of Reconciliation Week. The exhibition, Prevailing Voices – Indigenous Parliamentarians, features portraits of current and former Indigenous parliamentarians, personal stories, footage of first speeches and other objects of significance. Among the works is the newly commissioned portrait of the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, the first Indigenous Member of the House of Representatives. 

The exhibition runs until 30 July 2017.

Schools funding

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

A bill setting out new funding arrangements for schools has passed the House of Representatives. Introducing the Australian Education Amendment Bill 2017, the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, said it will ‘implement the Gonski-needs based approach.’

‘We will move to a truly needs-based approach that means that the same student with the same need attracts the same amount of Commonwealth funding in each state, territory, and school sector,’ she added.

She also announced that Mr David Gonski AC will lead a review of how to achieve educational excellence in Australian schools, which will ‘provide advice on how the extra Commonwealth funding should be invested to improve Australian schools' performance, and grow student achievement.’

The bill requires states and territories to maintain student funding levels as a condition of receiving federal funding. ‘This will prevent cost-shifting to the Commonwealth,’ Mrs Andrews said.

The opposition has said it will vote against the bill, claiming it cuts $22 billion of funding from Australian schools over the next decade. The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP, the Deputy Leader of the Opposition and Shadow Minister for Education, said the bill ‘would entrench a system that is not fair, that is not needs based, that is not sector blind.’

House condemns Manchester attack

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

‘An attack on innocence’ is how the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described the terrorist attack at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester. Speaking in the House of Representatives, he said the attack was ‘especially vile, especially criminal, especially horrific, because it appears to have been deliberately directed at teenagers.’

‘It is a basic human right to be able to go out into public places and public spaces, to shop, to go to a concert, to do our business, to take our exercise. Keeping Australians safe is our first priority, as keeping Britain safe is the first priority of Prime Minister May,’ Mr Turnbull said.

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, joined the Prime Minister in condemning the act. ‘The people of Britain should know that we feel their pain and we share their shock and anger,’ he said.

‘Today I offer my prayers and support to the people going through this, and a promise to lots of kids wondering about all of this that this is not the normal course of events and we will never accept it as the normal state of affairs,’ Mr Shorten added.

The House observed a minute’s silence to remember the victims of the attack.

Remote public servants

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

People in regional areas could be employed by the public service to work remotely under a private member’s bill introduced by Ms Cathy McGowan MP. Speaking on the Public Service Amendment (Supporting a Regional Workforce) Bill 2017, Ms McGowan said, ‘The intent of the bill is to remove any discrimination against an otherwise suitable candidate based on their location or capacity to move to a major city.’

‘If the candidate is able to telecommute and meet the requirements of the position, with reasonable adjustments by the agency, then they should have the opportunity to do so,’ she added.

In addition to allowing ‘agencies to attract the best and the brightest,’ Ms McGowan said the bill would add a regional perspective in the development of policy and encourage the decentralization of the public service. The bill was seconded by Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP.

Levy on big banks

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

The bank levy will help ensure the stability of Australia’s financial system, according to the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP. He was speaking on the Major Bank Levy Bill 2017 which introduces a levy, or tax, on banks with total liabilities, or commitments, of more than $100 billion.

The levy will raise $6.2 billion over four years, which Mr Morrison said, ‘represents a fair additional contribution from Australia's highly profitable major banks.’ The levy will contribute to repairing the Budget, which in turn will put Australia and the banks in a better position to manage shocks such as the global financial crisis, he said.

Referring to the inquiry into the four big banks conducted by House of Representatives Standing Committee, Mr Morrison said it found, ‘Australia's banking sector is an oligopoly and that Australia's largest banks have significant pricing power which they have used to the detriment of everyday Australians.’ The levy will make the banking sector more competitive, by helping to ‘create a more level playing field for smaller banks and non-bank competitors,’ he added.

Mr Morrison introduced a second bill, the Treasury Laws Amendment (Major Bank Levy) Bill 2017 which sets out how the levy will be calculated and collected.

Cancelling Centrelink debts of domestic violence victims

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

Victims of domestic violence could have their Centrelink debts waived, or cancelled, under a private member’s bill before the House of Representatives. Introducing the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Relieving Domestic Violence Victims of Debt) Bill 2017, Mr Andrew Wilkie MP said, ‘at virtually no significant cost to the federal budget, we could bring relief to those people in the community—often women—who, through no fault of their own, are now lumbered with often very large Centrelink debts.’

Referring to a constituent who was in a 20-year abusive relationship, Mr Wilkie said, ‘Through fear of her life, she was claiming money from Centrelink which went straight to her former abusive partner for him to spend and enjoy. But now not has she only got to overcome the emotional difficulties of that path but she has got to pay the debt.’

Acknowledging the work of the government in addressing what he described as Australia’s ‘family and domestic violence crisis,’ Mr Wilkie urged the government and opposition to get behind the bill.  

Firsts and more in the Parliament

Sitting period 22 to 31 May

The longest speech in the Parliament lasted 12 hours and 40 minutes. This is one of the facts featured in ‘First, most and more: facts about the Federal Parliament,’ an updated version of which has been released by the Parliamentary Library.

It covers everything from the number of members of parliament since federation (1716) to the member most often suspended from the House (Nick Champion, 82 times) to the youngest person to become Prime Minister (John Watson at the age of 37) and the longest serving Prime Minister (Robert Menzies, 16 years).

There is information about the youngest person elected to Parliament (Wyatt Roy, aged 20 years and three months) and the oldest (Senator Frederick Furner Ward, aged 75 years and one month). Astonishingly, given how rarely members and senators cross the floor now, the record for crossing the floor is held by Senator Reg Wright, who voted against his party a record 150 times between 1950 and 1978.

There are a large number of firsts too, including the first Indigenous member of parliament (Senator Neville Bonner), the first female leader of a political party (Senator Janine Haines, Australian Democrats) and the first female Prime Minister (Julia Gillard).

Linda Burney, the first Indigenous woman elected to the House of Representatives, was also the first member to be sung into the House of Representatives on 31 August 2016 by Wiradjuri woman, Lynette Riley. She sang in the Wiradjuri language from the public gallery as part of Ms Burney’s first speech.

As for that longest speech - it was made by Senator Albert Gardiner, who spoke on the Commonwealth Electoral Bill 1918 from 10.03 pm on 13 November to 10.43 am on 14 November 1918. The transcript of the speech took up 79 pages of Hansard. Since then, time limits have been introduced on speeches in both the Senate and House of Representatives.

Turnbull government's second budget

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

A focus on ‘fairness, security and opportunity’ is the theme of Australia’s federal Budget for 2017-18, according to the Treasurer, the Hon Scott Morrison MP.

Essentially, the federal Budget is the government’s annual statement of how it plans to collect and spend money for the coming financial year. It includes details about taxation and other measures the government uses to raise funds, and outlines the areas and activities where funds will be spent – for example, covering the cost of hospitals, welfare payments or the creation of infrastructure such as roads and railways.

In handing down the 2017 Budget, the Treasurer told the House of Representatives the Budget was ‘about making the right choices to secure the better days that are ahead. Our choices are based on the principles of fairness, security, and opportunity.’

During his Budget speech, the Treasurer said that while the global economy was improving, the government ‘must choose to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on...and choose to ensure the Government lives within its means.’

Among the measures proposed in the 2017 Budget, the Treasurer noted:

  • an 0.5 per cent increase to the Medicare Levy from 2019 to help fund the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)
  • an increase in the amount of funding provided to most schools – although university students will have to pay more for their degrees, and will be required to begin repaying their Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debt once they earn $42 000
  • lifting the freeze on the Medicare rebate (the amount of money the government provides to cover the cost of seeing a medical practitioner and for particular health tests) which should lower patients' out-of-pocket expenses 
  • changes for first-home buyers, including allowing them to make additional contributions into their superannuation account (which is taxed at a lower rate than a general savings account) and then later withdraw this money for a house deposit
  • additional funding for the Australian Federal Police to help advance Australia's fight against crime and terrorism.

In addition, the Treasurer announced more than $8 billion would be spent on building an inland rail network from Melbourne to Brisbane, and flagged the introduction of a new levy for Australia’s major banks. Funding for defence forces remains largely unchanged, but the amount of foreign aid Australia provides to developing countries will be frozen for two years.

The Budget is introduced into the Parliament as a series of bills called appropriation bills. These bills are examined by both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Once both chambers are in agreement, the bills are sent to the Governor-General for Royal Assent.

Locking up the Budget

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

For many journalists, members of interest groups, public servants and political staff, the federal Budget means being – quite literally – locked up in Parliament House for six hours.

Known as the budget lockup, the process sees these people confined to several of Parliament House’s committee rooms between 1.30pm and 7.30pm on the day the federal Budget is to be delivered.

Because of the sensitivity of information contained in the federal Budget, the lockup ensures no attendee has an advantage over another. No-one is allowed to bring in mobile phones, and once in the lockup, cannot leave and do not have access to email or the internet.

Once they are in the lockup, all attendees are provided with copies of the Budget papers, the Treasurer’s Budget speech and supporting documents. They can then use the time during lockup to review the Budget, determine what elements of it they consider important, prepare reports that can be published or broadcast and advise members of parliament about its main features, as soon as the lockup ends.

Opposition Leader’s Budget reply

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

The Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP, delivered his reply to the federal Budget, saying a Labor Budget would focus on fairness in education, equality, healthcare and the housing market.

Like the Treasurer’s Budget speech, the Budget reply provides an opportunity for the Leader of the Opposition to publicly outline their party’s views on the government’s proposed Budget. The reply speech is an important part of scrutinising, or carefully examining, the Budget and holding the government to account. It also allows the opposition to set out any alternative policies they have regarding proposals to raise and spend money.

During his speech to the House of Representatives, Mr Shorten outlined the Budget measures that would be implemented by the Labor Party, including:

  • an increase to the Medicare Levy, but only for those people earning over $87 000 per year
  • a requirement for every major infrastructure project funded by the Australian Government to ensure that every 1 in 10 employees is an Australian apprentice
  • additional funding for TAFE, schools, and universities
  • doubling the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Rangers to help benefit the environment, tourism and develop new enterprises.

While Mr Shorten acknowledged the introduction of a levy for Australia’s major banks, he noted the need to ensure the charge wasn’t passed on to consumers. In addition, Mr Shorten said a Labor Budget would abolish negative gearing and introduce new initiatives to improve housing affordability.

Swearing-in of Lucy Gichuhi

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

The number of senators in the Senate has been returned to 76 following the swearing-in of Ms Lucy Gichuhi as a Senator for South Australia.

“I am honoured and humbled to be sworn in as the first ever person of Black African descent in the Australian Parliament,’ Senator Gichuhi said in a statement on Facebook.

Senator Gichuhi will take her seat as an Independent, replacing former Senator Bob Day, who was found by the Court of Disputed Returns to have been ineligible to stand at the 2016 election.

Born in Kenya, Senator Gichuhi moved to Australia with her husband and children in 1999 and became an Australian citizen in 2001. Prior to her election, Senator Gichuhi was a volunteer lawyer with the Women's Legal Service, and has worked as an accountant in the private and public sectors.

Committee to examine public interest journalism

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

The impact of social media, ‘fake news’ and ‘click-bait’ on journalism will be examined by a Senate Select Committee on the Future of Public Interest Journalism.

In a wide-ranging inquiry, the committee will explore national and international public interest journalism and the role of government in ensuring a viable, independent and diverse service. The future of community broadcasters in regional Australia and culturally and linguistically diverse areas will also be investigated.

In a media release, the Chair of the committee, Senator Sam Dastyari, said journalism plays a vital role in keeping politicians accountable, and recent events emphasised the need for better policy settings to ensure quality journalism was sustainable into the future.

The committee is expected to report by 7 December 2017.

Rotary Adventure in Citizenship

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

Twenty-five year 11 students from around Australia have been given a behind-the-scenes look at the Parliament as part of this year’s Rotary Adventure in Citizenship program.

During the week-long program, students were provided with a unique perspective on Parliament in action (including the Budget speech and Question Time), met their federal member and participated in law-making debates and other learning activities.

Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Hon Tony Smith MP, formally welcomed RAIC students to Parliament during Question Time, saying ‘I would like to recognise, in the southern gallery, the Rotary Adventure in Citizenship students, who have been in Canberra all of this week. I welcome them on behalf of all members.’

Committee to investigate effects of climate change

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

The effects of climate change on housing, buildings and infrastructure will be the focus of an inquiry by the Senate Environment and Communications References Committee.

The committee will examine several climate scenarios, including rising sea levels, storm surges, temperature changes and extreme weather conditions triggering bushfires and floods. The resulting impact of climate change on housing and infrastructure such as railways and roads, water and energy suppliers, hospitals and schools will be investigated. The question of whether state and national government policies to tackle these issues are adequate will also be addressed.

The committee is expected to report by 23 November 2017.

Youth jobs bill

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

The Senate passed the government’s Youth Jobs Path bill, after agreeing to a cross-bench amendment, or change, requiring a review of the program after two years.

The Social Security Legislation Amendment (Youth Jobs Path: Prepare, Trial, Hire) Bill 2016 ensures fortnightly incentive payments made to young job seekers undertaking internships under the Youth Jobs  Prepare-Trial-Hire (PATH) Program do not affect their social security payments.

The PATH program aims to improve young people’s employability by providing them with work experience. Under the program, young job seekers who undertake voluntary internships of between four and 12 weeks will receive an extra $200 each fortnight in addition to their welfare payment.

The amendment was proposed by South Australian Senator Stirling Griff, from the Nick Xenophon Team. Acknowledging the bill ‘has the potential to change the life path of young people for the better,’ the Senator warned ‘We should not set these young people up for inadvertent failure by pushing them into training and a job in which they have no interest or desire to engage.’ The two-year review will investigate if the program is working as intended.

The amendment was agreed to by the House of Representatives, which originally passed the bill in November 2016.

Breastfeeding in the Parliament

Sitting period 9 to 11 May

Queensland Senator Larissa Waters has made history by becoming the first woman to breastfeed her baby in Parliament. 

Shortly afterwards, Senator Waters tweeted, ‘So proud that my daughter Alia is the first baby to be breastfed in the federal Parliament! We need more #women & parents in Parli #auspol.’

Senate standing orders (the rules of the chamber) were changed in 2003 to allow senators to breastfeed infants in the chamber; however, until Senator Waters took Alia into the Senate, no one had done so.

Senator Waters initiated changes to standing orders last year to also allow senators to care for their infants in the chamber for brief periods, at the discretion of the President of the Senate and as long as the business of the Senate is not disrupted.

In February 2016, the House of Representatives agreed to change its standing orders to allow members to nurse infants in the chamber. At the time, the Manager of Government Business, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, said the changes made the Australian Parliament family-friendly.

Carly’s law

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

People who lie about their age to minors online will be prosecuted under a bill dubbed ‘Carly’s Law’, which also gives police the power to intervene before online predators have a chance to act.

The bill was named after Carly Ryan, a 15-year-old who was murdered in 2007 by an online predator posing as a teenage boy.

Introducing the Criminal Code Amendment (Protecting Minors Online) Bill 2017 in the House of Representatives, the Minister for Justice, the Hon Michael Keenan MP, said it will give young Australians ‘greater protection from online predators and serve as a significant deterrent to those who would do them harm’.

‘Adults preparing or planning to cause harm to, procure, or engage in sexual activity with a child…now may be punished by up to 10 years imprisonment. Importantly, this will also include those who misrepresent their age,’ Mr Keenan said.

The minister thanked Carly’s mother, Sonya Ryan, who founded the Carly Ryan Foundation to promote internet safety and support victims, and tirelessly campaigned for the bill. He also acknowledged South Australian Senator Nick Xenophon who introduced an earlier version of Carly’s Law in the Senate.

Changes to racial discrimination law

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

The Parliament has passed a bill to reform the way the Australian Human Rights Commission examines and reports on claims of racism. These include setting time limits to examine and report on claims, and giving the President of the Commission the power to end an inquiry into a claim if they are satisfied there is no reason to continue.

Introducing the Human Rights Legislation Amendment Bill 2017, the Attorney-General, Senator the Hon George Brandis, said the changes ‘amend the Commission's complaints handling processes to ensure that unmeritorious complaints are terminated and respondents are not put to great personal and financial cost’.

The bill also sought to amend, or change, Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 to replace the words ‘offend’, ‘insult’ and ‘humiliate’ with ‘harass’. The Senate did not agree to these changes.

The reforms to the Australian Human Rights Commission included in the bill stemmed from several recommendations made by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights following a wide-ranging inquiry into the operation of laws relating to racial discrimination.

Leaders visit cyclone-ravaged Queensland

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

In the wake of Cyclone Debbie, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, has praised the people of North Queensland and the Australian Defence Force, saying they 'make every Australian proud.' He was speaking in the House of Representatives after touring cyclone-affected regions of Queensland with the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Bill Shorten MP.

'I have to say that nature flings her worst at us again and again, and North Queensland feels the brunt of that again and again. But when Australians pull together, when they work together in a common cause, they can tackle anything,' Mr Turnbull said.

The Prime Minister noted some 1300 defence personnel have been deployed to North Queensland – 'the biggest pre-deployment of Australian Defence Force servicemen and servicewomen in the anticipation of a natural disaster'.

Endorsing the response of the federal government to the cyclone, Mr Shorten said recovery for the people of North Queensland will take a long time.

'Australians can vote with their feet to support these people by taking a holiday in the region in the coming months. It is a beautiful patch of Australia, and we should all be getting behind them,' Mr Shorten said.

Social services savings bill

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

The Parliament has passed a package of welfare savings which the government says will help pay for its childcare package. Introducing the Social Services Legislation Amendment Bill 2017 in the Senate, the Attorney-General, Senator the Hon George Brandis, said it will save $2.4 billion over the 2017-18 financial year 'building to a $6.8 billion dollar saving over the medium term.'

Initially the measures were part of the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Omnibus Savings and Child Care Reform) Bill 2017 which also included the childcare package and changes to social security payments. However, the government decided to introduce this smaller bill after it became clear the original omnibus bill would not be supported by the Senate.

Under the new bill, the rate of family tax payment will be frozen for two years. Income-free areas and the means-test threshold for certain payments and allowances will also be kept at their current levels for three years.

In addition, waiting periods for the parenting payment and youth allowance for a person who is not undertaking full-time study and is not a new apprentice will be extended and simplified. The income stream review process will be automated with the aim of improving the accuracy of income support payments.

Senator Brandis acknowledged 'the positive way in which the crossbench has worked with the government to deliver this significant reform package that will make a real and positive difference to nearly one million Australian families.'

More support for childcare

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Childcare will be more affordable for most Australian families under a bill passed by the Parliament, according to the Minister for Education and Training, Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham. He was speaking on the Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Jobs for Families Child Care Package) Bill 2016.

The bill introduces a number of reforms aimed at making childcare and early childcare education 'simpler, more affordable, more accessible and more flexible,' Senator Birmingham said.

Around one million Australian families would benefit from the package, he added, as it will provide 'the greatest hours of support to the families who are working the longest hours, and the greatest financial support to the families who are earning the least.'

Under the changes, the childcare subsidy for low-income families will increase from around 72 to 85 per cent. The subsidy drops to 80 per cent for high-income families. The bill passed the Senate after it agreed to an amendment proposed by Victorian Senator Derryn Hinch that the childcare subsidy cuts out for families earning above $350 000 per year.

Initially the childcare package was part of the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Omnibus Savings and Child Care Reform) Bill 2017, but was introduced as a separate bill when it became clear the Senate would not support all the measures in the omnibus bill.

Banking inquiry bill

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

A Commission of Inquiry examining the conduct and practices of banks, insurance companies and other providers in the financial services industry would be set up under a private member's bill before the House of Representatives. The Commission would report on its findings and recommendations directly to the Parliament, unlike a Royal Commission, which reports to the government.

Introducing the People of Australia's Commission of Inquiry (Banking and Financial Services) Bill 2017, the Hon Bob Katter MP said 'I doubt whether there would be five per cent of this country who would say that an inquiry into the banks is not needed.'

Bill to protect penalty rates

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

A private senator's bill to stop a decision by the Fair Work Commission to cut Sunday penalty rates for hospitality and retail workers from going ahead was passed by the Senate. Under the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take-Home Pay) Bill 2017, modern awards, which outline the minimum pay rates and conditions of employment, cannot be varied to reduce the take-home pay of any employee.

Introducing the bill, NSW Senator Doug Cameron said 'Wages growth is at historic lows and underemployment is at record highs. There could not be a worse time to cut workers' take-home pay; a fate workers will not have to suffer if this Bill is passed.'

The Fair Work Commission's decision could not just affect retail and hospitality workers, Senator Cameron warned. 'Workers such as nurses, teachers, community workers, disability workers, cleaners and construction workers are, as a result of this decision, at risk of seeing their penalty rates cut in the future,' he said.

The bill was co-sponsored by three crossbench senators: Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale, Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie and Queensland Senator Malcolm Roberts. It will now be considered by the House of Representatives, where it is unlikely to be passed as it is opposed by the government.

New senator sworn-in

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Mr Peter Georgiou was sworn-in as a senator for Western Australia. He takes up the vacancy created when the High Court of Australia determined that Mr Rod Culleton was not eligible to stand for the Senate at the 2016 election under section 44 of the Australian Constitution.

The vacancy was filled by a recount of the 2016 ballot without Mr Culleton as a candidate. Senator Georgiou is a member of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation party.

Company tax cuts pass Senate

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Companies with a yearly turnover of up to $50 million will receive tax cuts under a bill passed by the Senate. The Senate sat for an additional day to consider the bill.

Under the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan) Bill 2016, the company tax rate will be progressively lowered from 30 per cent to 25 per cent, with the tax cuts to be rolled out over the next three years based on a company's annual turnover.

Companies with an annual turnover of up to $10 million in the 2016-17 financial year will have their tax rate lowered to 27.5 per cent. Companies with an annual turnover of up to $25 million will receive the cut in the 2017-18 financial year, and those with an annual turnover of up to $50 million will receive the cut in 2018-19.

The government plans to eventually reduce the company tax rate to 25 per cent for all companies with an annual turnover of up to $50 million.

Speaking in the Senate, the Minister for Finance, Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann, described the bill as 'the most significant reform to Australia's business taxation framework in a generation.' The measures will 'boost investment, boost productivity, generate stronger growth and, of course, create more jobs and, over time, increase real wages,' he said.

Initially, the government proposed extending the tax cuts only to companies with larger turnover; however, the Senate opposed this. After much negotiation, the bill passed with the support of senators from the Nick Xenophon Team, Pauline Hanson's One Nation, and Senator Derryn Hinch. Senator Cormann described the negotiations with the crossbench senators as 'good and effective' and 'constructive work'.

In return for the support of the Nick Xenophon Team, the government agreed to a number of energy measures, including fast tracking a solar-thermal plant in South Australia and supporting the development of a gas pipeline from the Northern Territory to South Australia.

Additionally, the government agreed to a one-off payment for people on the age pension, disability support pension and parenting payment to help them cover electricity costs. Single people will receive $75 and couples $125.

The amended bill will now return to the House of Representatives, where it was originally passed on 27 March.

Chinese extradition treaty

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Regulations to give effect to an extradition treaty with China were repealed by the government after it became clear the Senate would disallow, or not agree to, these regulations.

An Act of Parliament, in this case the Extradition Act 1988, sometimes delegates, or gives, the government the authority to make regulations, or laws, in keeping with the Act. The Parliament has the right to disallow, or overrule, these regulations if it does not agree with them. This right is a key part of the Parliament’s oversight of the law-making power it delegates to the government.

South Australian Senator Cory Bernardi had signalled his intention to introduce a motion in the Senate to disallow the Extradition (People’s Republic of China) Regulations 2017 because of human rights concerns. The opposition, the Australian Greens and the Nick Xenophon Team supported the move.

Under the treaty, which was signed in 2007, Chinese nationals living in Australia and accused of crimes under Chinese laws could be extradited, or returned, to China to be tried. Likewise, China would extradite Australian citizens under the same circumstances. However, the Australian government would not extradite a person to China if it believed they would face the death penalty for their crimes.

Innovation committee to consider driverless vehicles

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Could driverless vehicles help reduce accidents and improve mobility – or will they result in job losses and threaten the safety of other road users?

These are some of the issues being explored as the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Industry, Innovation, Science and Resources conducts an inquiry into driverless vehicles.

'Testing of driverless vehicles has begun here in Australia and in many other countries around the world,' Committee Chair, Ms Michelle Landry MP said.

Ms Landry said the committee would consider the technological developments and social issues of land-based driverless vehicles, including cars, trucks, buses and trains.

'Our inquiry will focus on issues such as the social acceptance of the technology, how it might benefit Australians with limited mobility, and the potential social implications for driverless vehicles in the industrial and public transport sectors.'

The committee will hold public hearings in Melbourne, Canberra, Sydney and Brisbane, and is expected to report by September 2017.

Screening of airport workers

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

People working at airports and who have access to aircraft will be randomly screened under a bill passed by the Parliament as an additional safeguard against unlawful interference with aviation facilities.

The Transport Security Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 will allow screening of people, vehicles and goods within an airside area or zone at a security controlled airport.

The Special Minister of State and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Cabinet, Senator the Hon Scott Ryan, noted, 'Airport workers such as baggage handlers, caterers, cleaners and engineers have special access to passenger aircraft so they can carry out their important roles. However, there is potential for this access to be exploited, either willingly or through coercion, to facilitate an attack against a passenger aircraft.'

The new airport screening is part of a package of measures to ensure 'the Australian public is provided with safe and secure air travel,' Senator Ryan said.

Airport security

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

The need for ongoing vigilance in ensuring the safety and security of aviation in Australia has been reinforced in a recent Senate inquiry completed by the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee.

The report, Airport and Aviation Security, which was tabled in late March, noted that 'While a major aviation security event is yet to occur in Australia, there continues to be ongoing concerns about airport security and safety.'

'With nearly 100 million airline passengers travelling in Australia each year and utilising various airport facilities, the importance of aviation security becomes clear,' the report said.

The committee made a number of recommendations, including calling on the government to consider creating a central authority to issue Aviation Security Identification Cards. It also recommended a framework be developed to ensure subcontractors who conduct security screening at airports have appropriate employment standards training.

Any future reviews of and changes to aviation security regulation should take into account the unique challenges faced by regional and rural airports and the overall diversity of Australian airports, the committee said.

Crowd-sourcing bill

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

It will be easier and less expensive for small businesses to raise equity, or money, through crowd-sourcing, under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Corporations Amendment (Crowd-sourced Funding) Bill 2016 also includes measures to provide more information and protections for people who invest through crowd-sourcing.

Crowd-sourced funding refers to the practice in which investors usually contribute an amount of money to small or start-up enterprises in return for an equity stake in the business. The bill, which was introduced in the House of Representatives at the end of last year, was passed by the Senate with one opposition amendment, or change, to strengthen protections for investors. The House agreed to the change.

Report explores impact of flying-foxes in urban areas

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

Finding a balance between protecting flying-foxes and limiting their impact on residents, businesses and farmers in eastern Australia was the focus of a recent report published by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy.

The Committee's report, 'Living with fruit bats', was tabled in Parliament in late February, and makes several recommendations on managing flying-fox populations in urban areas, including addressing the issues and impacts they create for many local communities.

'Flying-foxes are environmentally important, and we need to ensure they continue to thrive into the future. At the same time, it's clear that the impacts of flying-foxes on affected residents can be significant,' Committee Chair Mr Andrew Broad MP said.

During the inquiry, the Committee heard from experts, local councils, interest groups and individual members of the community in the eastern states of Australia.

'Ensuring that there is a balance between the need to protect these important animals, with the ongoing effective management of their impact on the environment and the communities that share their habitat, [was] a focus for the Committee,' Mr Broad said.

Parliament House abuzz

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

The Parliament House gardens will soon be home to thousands of honey bees as part of the fight against the global decline in bees. While the bee hives will produce honey within six months, their main purpose is to highlight how bees are critical to our food supply.

The Australian National University Apiculture Society came up with the idea to install the hives at Parliament House following a 2014 report by the Senate Standing Committee on Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport into the 'Future of the beekeeping and pollination service industries in Australia'. The report underlined how bees, through their pollination services, are vital to food security, the environment, and the agriculture and horticulture industries.

The Australian Parliament will join other international and national institutions with resident beehives including the Scottish Parliament, the White House in Washington DC, the parliaments of Western Australia and Queensland and Government House in Canberra.

It is not the first time bees have been kept at Parliament House. In 1976, William Yates, the previous Member for Holt, managed bee hives in the gardens of Old Parliament House. The new hives will use Australian-designed and award-winning 'Flow Hive' technology which allows the honey to be collected without disrupting the bees or opening the hive. Honey from the Parliament House bees will eventually be available from the Parliament House Shop.

Safe-keeping the honey bee

Sitting period 20 to 30 March

The honey bee industry is facing increasing threats from invasive pests and diseases arriving into Australia, including the Asian honey bee and the Varroa mite. This was one of the findings of an inquiry by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Agriculture and Water Resources into the biosecurity of Australian honey bees.

The committee found that while Australian biosecurity controls have so far been successful, there is an ongoing risk and more needs to be done to identify and capture non-native bees arriving at Australian ports.

It made a number of recommendations, including strengthening the National Bee Pest Surveillance Program, finding ways to involve the public in detecting bees and undertaking additional research into bee smuggling into Australia.

The committee noted Australian honey bees, through their pollination services, 'provide critical environmental and economic benefits to the agricultural industry, estimated to be worth $4 billion' each year.

Senate Estimates

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

Additional Senate Estimates hearings were held from 27 February to 2 March. The hearings, which are conducted by the eight Senate legislative committees, allow senators to closely examine the operations of the government, including spending and delivery of services.

Among the issues canvassed during the hearings were:

  • strategies to tackle obesity, including the option of a tax on high-sugar drinks
  • interruptions to electricity supply
  • the state of the Great Barrier Reef
  • the pay package of Australia Post’s Managing Director
  • Australian-made content on television
  • gender balance at work
  • the increase in the Senate informal vote at the last election
  • the welfare of detainees in Regional Processing Centres in Papua New Guinea (Manus Island) and Nauru, and in on-shore immigration detention
  • resourcing mental health care services
  • patients' access to medicinal cannabis
  • yellow crazy ants in the Wet Tropics Area of North Queensland
  • automated debt recovery notices issued by Centrelink
  • young people in aged care facilities
  • housing affordability
  • company tax rates and cuts
  • school funding
  • suicide prevention services for veterans.

 Because of Senate Estimates, the Senate did not sit during this period.

Committee workload

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

Senate committees continue to produce 'very good committee reports', the Clerk of the Senate, Mr Richard Pye has said. He was responding to a question about an increase in the workload of Senate committees while appearing before the Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee during Estimates hearings.

Up until 16 February, the 45th Parliament has seen 107 bills and other matters referred to Senate committees for inquiry, 68 committee reports tabled in the Senate and 90 committee hearings conducted, Mr Pye told the committee. This compares to 80 references and 66 reports in the same time period in the 44th Parliament, and 70 references and 49 reports in the 43rd Parliament.

Despite the increase in committee references, Mr Pye said one of the 'strengths of the Senate committee system is that the Senate can choose which matters should go to committees and be considered by committees.'

Call to keep university fees in check

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

The Deputy Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Tanya Plibersek MP, has called on the government to ‘rule out significant fee increases’ for university students. She was speaking on a motion in the House of Representatives which also asked the government to abandon a planned 20 per cent cut to university grants.

Ms Plibersek said increasing fees will leave young Australians with significant debt, which will put extra pressure on them ‘at critical times in their lives, like when they are saving for a house or considering starting a family.’

Committee examines freedom of speech

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

Community leaders and politicians should speak out against racially hateful and discriminatory speech. This was one of 22 recommendations made by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights following a wide-ranging inquiry into the operation of laws relating to racial discrimination. The committee also recommended Australians should be educated about dealing with racism and the best way to address it under the law.

As part of its inquiry, the committee examined ways to ensure the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 strikes a better balance between people’s right to freedom of speech and the right to be free from serious racism. The committee set out several options in its report ‘Freedom of speech in Australia’ ranging from not changing the Act, removing certain words and replacing them with others, and investigating whether to include criminal charges for inciting, or stirring up, racial violence.

The report also recommended the Australian Human Rights Commission change some of the ways it receives and deals with claims of racism. These included setting time limits to examine and report on claims, and giving the President of the Commission the power to end an inquiry into a claim if they are satisfied there is no reason to continue.

In presenting the report to the House of Representatives, Committee Chair Mr Ian Goodenough MP, said many Australians had spoken to the committee, which showed ‘the balance between protection from racial discrimination and freedom of expression is an issue about which many Australians have a keen interest.’

Omnibus bill to encourage workforce participation

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

A bill aimed at encouraging and supporting greater workforce participation for those who can work was passed by the House of Representatives. Introducing the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Omnibus Savings and Child Care Reform) Bill 2017, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said workforce participation and self-reliance was 'central to improving long-term wellbeing.'

Key to the bill is the Jobs for Families Child Care Package which aims to make childcare more affordable and easier to access. Under the package, families on incomes of $65 710 or less will receive the highest 85 per cent rate of childcare subsidy, which is an increase on the current rate of about 72 per cent. 'It is estimated that our reforms will encourage more than 230,000 families to increase their involvement in paid employment,' Mr Porter said.

The bill includes a number of changes to social security payments including increasing the age at which people can receive the Newstart Allowance and Sickness Allowance from 22 to 25 years. It also introduces a new four-week waiting period for job-ready young people aged under 25 years who claim Youth Allowance.

Mr Porter urged the Parliament to support the proposals 'to encourage workforce participation and ensure the long-term sustainability of our welfare system.'

The bill will now be considered by the Senate.

NDIS fund

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

A special account will be set up to help the government fund the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme Savings Fund Special Account Bill 2016, the Minister for Social Services, the Hon Christian Porter MP, said the 'government is fully committed to properly, adequately and sustainably funding the NDIS'.

The NDIS provides support for people living with disability. 'Importantly, the scheme empowers people with disabilities to make their own decisions about how they are supported,' Mr Porter said.

The bill will now be considered by the Senate.

Private bill to monitor travel expenses

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

All travel claims made by members of parliament since the 2013 election would be retrospectively audited, or checked, under a private members' bill. Introducing the Parliamentary Entitlements Amendment (Ending the Rorts) Bill 2017, Mr Andrew Wilkie MP said it 'would build on the reforms' agreed to by the Parliament in recent weeks.

In addition, members of parliament would be required to list substantive work and private activities conducted when making a travel claim. This information would be publicly available online, so 'the bureaucracy here...but also the public would be able to look and make their own judgement,' about the use of travel entitlements, Mr Wilkie said.

The bill also enables law enforcement agencies to be contacted to investigate misuse of travel claims.

On the same day Mr Wilkie introduced the bill, a petition signed by 8536 people was presented to the House of Representations calling for entitlement payments to stop once members of parliament leave Parliament.

Support for struggling farmers

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

Farmers experiencing financial hardship could access support sooner under a bill passed by the House of Representatives. Introducing the Farm Household Support Amendment Bill 2017, the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, the Hon Barnaby Joyce MP, said the bill 'demonstrates this government's responsiveness to the needs of the farming community.'

Long wait times for the Farm Household Allowance program can make it hard for people to run their farms, Mr Joyce said. The program provides up to three years of income support paid at the same rate as the Newstart allowance.

The bill will now be considered by the Senate.

Twenty-five years photographing the Parliament

Sitting period 27 February – 2 March

For more than 25 years, photographer David Foote has had a front row-seat to Australia's political history. As part of the Australian Government Photographic Service, AUSPIC, Mr Foote has taken over 1.5 million photographs documenting not just the day-to-day activities of the Parliament, but key events around the world.

Now some of David's iconic photographs are on display at Parliament House in Canberra. They feature Prime Ministers as far back as the Hon Bob Hawke and include a photograph of the Hon John Howard taken in Washington on the day of the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks.

Among the world leaders captured by David Foote's lens are the Dala Lamai, and US Presidents, Barack Obama and George W. Bush. He's also photographed official visits by royalty, including Prince William and Princess Kate, and Crown Princess Mary of Denmark.

Incidentally, many of the photographs on the PEO website showing the Parliament in action are the work of Mr Foote. 'The Official Observer – David Foote 25 years in AUSPIC' is on display until 14 May.

Expanded role for eSafety commissioner

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

The role of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner is set to expand under a bill introduced in the House of Representatives. Speaking on the Enhancing Online Safety for Children Amendment Bill 2017, the Minister for Urban Infrastructure, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, said the Commissioner will ‘cover online safety for all Australians, not just Australian children’.

This ‘will allow the commissioner to take on a broader online safety role and carry out important work on the government’s election commitments relating to women’s safety, and to online safety for older Australians,’ the minister said. In line with this, the commissioner will be called the eSafety Commissioner.

The expanded role – and title of ‘eSafety Commissioner’ – came about as a result of a discussion between Senator Skye Kakoschke-Moore and the acting Children’s eSafety Commissioner during Senate Estimates in October 2016. During the discussion, Senator Kakoschke-Moore suggested the earlier title ‘Children’s eSafety Commissioner’ might discourage adults from seeking help from the commission.

Culleton not eligible to stand

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

The High Court of Australia has determined Rod Culleton was not eligible to stand for the Senate at the 2016 election under section 44 of the Australian Constitution. Section 44 covers the qualifications to be elected a senator, including those relating to Australian citizenship, criminal record and financial interests.

At the time of the election, Mr Culleton had been convicted and was subject to be sentenced for an offence, or crime, for which he could have been imprisoned for one year or longer. In addition, Mr Culleton was disqualified on a second ground – for effectively being declared bankrupt.

However, Mr Culleton’s ineligibility to sit in the Senate does not invalidate, or undo, any Senate proceedings in which he took part. This is based on a 1907 decision by the High Court.

WA Senate vacancy

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

The High Court’s decision that Rod Culleton was ineligible to stand for election creates a vacancy for Western Australia in the Senate.

Informing the Senate of the High Court’s judgement, the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Stephen Parry, said the vacancy would be filled by a special count – a recount of the 2016 ballot without Mr Culleton as a candidate.

By contrast, in cases where a vacancy is caused by the resignation or death of a senator, section 15 of the Australian Constitution directs that the new senator is appointed by the parliament in the state or territory from which the original senator was chosen.

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Read the transcript: Qualification of senators

Senator Bernardi resigns from party

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Senator Cory Bernardi has resigned from the Liberal Party of Australia to sit as a member of a newly formed party, the Australian Conservatives. Making the announcement in the Senate, Senator Bernardi described the decision as perhaps the most difficult of his political life.

Outlining plans to build a new conservative political movement, he said ‘The body politic is failing the people of Australia. It is clear that we need to find a better way.’ His resignation increases the number of Senate crossbenchers to 21.

How can a senator resign – but still remain a senator?

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

The decision of Senator Cory Bernardi to leave the Liberal Party raises the question of how a senator can resign from their party, but still retain their Senate seat.

While senators may represent a political party, they are elected by the voters of a particular state or territory and represent that state or territory.

This means Senator Bernardi remains a senator as long as he meets the qualifications outlined by the Australian Constitution

The Leader of the Government in the Senate, Senator the Hon George Brandis, said the Liberal Party was ‘disappointed by the course that Senator Bernardi has taken.’ 

‘We believe that he has done the wrong thing, because only seven months ago Senator Bernardi was elected by the people of South Australia to serve in the Senate as a Liberal Senator,’ he added.

Disorderly conduct in the House

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Raising a frivolous point of order can get you suspended from the House of Representatives, as the Member for McMahon discovered on the first day Parliament resumed sitting for 2017. The Hon Chris Bowen MP was directed by the Speaker, under standing order 94, to leave the House for one hour. Standing order 94 is just one of the procedures, or tools, the Speaker can use to keep order in the House.

Disorderly conduct and the Speaker’s authority to deal with such behaviour is the subject of a new research paper, ‘That's it, you’re out’: disorderly conduct in the House of Representatives from 1901 to 2016’.

The paper from the Parliamentary Library found:

  • most disorderly behaviour occurs during and directly after Question Time
  • disorderly behaviour tends to increase each day as the sitting week progresses
  • ninety per cent of those ejected from the House were members of the opposition, regardless of which party or parties were in the role
  • no Prime Minister has been sanctioned, or disciplined, for disorderly behaviour.

More work needed to close the gap

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

All Australian governments have much more work to do to close the gap for Indigenous Australians, according to the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP. He was speaking in the House of Representatives while delivering the 9th Closing the Gap report, which details how federal, state and territory governments are meeting targets to improve outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

The seven Closing the Gap targets cover areas such as health, education, employment and life expectancy. Currently, Australia is only on track to meet one of these – to increase the number of Indigenous Australians completing Year 12. 

Acknowledging governments must work with Indigenous Australians to address this disadvantage, the Prime Minister promised the federal government would ‘not shy away from our responsibility’. Mr Turnbull said ‘we will uphold the priorities of education, employment, health and the right of all people to be safe from family violence.’ 

Made in Australia food labelling

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

New and clearer labels indicating if food was grown, produced or made in Australia will be introduced under a bill passed by the Parliament. The Competition and Consumer Amendment (Country of Origin) Bill 2016, which was presented in the House of Representatives towards the end of last year, aims to help consumers make informed purchasing decisions.

In addition to the well-known kangaroo in a triangle symbol, new labels for food will include a bar chart and words to indicate the proportion of Australian ingredients in the food.

The new labelling was developed after extensive consultation with business, the community, state and territory governments and overseas trading partners. The bill also incorporated ideas put forward in a number of private senators’ bills introduced in previous parliaments.

Bourke Street donations tax deductible

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Donations to the Bourke Street Fund will be tax deductible under a bill passed by the Parliament. The fund was set up by the Victorian government to support the families affected by the attack in Bourke Street in Melbourne on 20 January.

Introducing the Treasury Laws Amendment (Bourke Street Fund) Bill 2017, the Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, the Hon Kelly O’Dwyer MP, said ‘Australians are rightly as one in our condemnation of this evil act. But we are also united in our empathy for those whose lives have been lost and our desire to console those for whom life will never be the same.’

The donations to the fund are a ‘measure of our community's genuine desire to help and sustain the victims of this terrible crime,’ she said.

When Parliament resumed following the tragedy, the Senate observed a minute’s silence to mark what it said was ‘a senseless act.’ Extending ‘its heartfelt sympathy to the families and loved ones of those affected’, the Senate thanked the Victorian police, paramedics and firefighters, and bystanders who were among the first to respond.

An ‘ordinary day shattered by terrible violence,’ is how the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, described the tragedy. Speaking in the House of Representatives, the Prime Minister also expressed ‘heartfelt condolences’ on behalf of the Australian people and the Parliament.

Authority to oversee parliamentarians' expenses

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

An independent authority to administer and oversee the travel and related expenses of parliamentarians is to be set up under a bill agreed to by the Parliament.

Introducing the Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority Bill 2017, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP said, 'As parliamentarians we have a duty to ensure that our spending of public money meets the expectations of the Australian public. Transparency and accountability are critical to meeting this duty and demonstrating that it has been met.'

The bill is part of a wider overhaul of parliamentarians' entitlements announced by the government. The Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority will commence on 1 July 2017.

Members of parliament vote to cut entitlements

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

The House of Representatives and the Senate have agreed to cut entitlements for retiring members of parliament. The Parliamentary Entitlements Legislation Amendment Bill 2017 will remove the Life Gold Pass – which allows free domestic air travel – for all retired parliamentarians, other than retired former prime ministers and their spouses.

Any travel undertaken by former prime ministers under the renamed Parliamentary Retirement Travel Entitlement scheme must be for the public benefit - and not for a commercial or private purpose. In addition, there will be a limit on the number of trips allowed.

Under the bill’s other changes, ministers, presiding officers and opposition spokespeople can only claim domestic travel expenses for dependent children under 18 years of age. In the past they could claim for children under 25 years. As well, there will be a financial penalty for parliamentarians who make an incorrect travel claim.  

Private bill to ban full face coverings

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Senator Jacqui Lambie has proposed a ban on people wearing full face coverings in certain public places. Under the Criminal Code Amendment (Prohibition of Full Face Coverings in Public Places) Bill 2017, the ban would only apply when the National Terrorism Threat Level had reached 'probable'.

Speaking on her private senator's bill, Senator Lambie acknowledged the right of people to 'express their religion, custom and culture.' However, 'the security and the safety of the community must come first,' she said.

The ban would apply to face covering such as helmets, masks, balaclavas and the hijab. It includes a number of exemptions including where face coverings are required for work, artistic, entertainment or sporting reasons and to operate safety equipment.

The ban would be in place in areas controlled by the federal government such as airports and ports. It would also apply in the ACT and NT.

Bill tackles illegal gambling services

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Greater measures will be taken to protect Australians from illegal online gambling services under a bill passed by the House of Representatives. The Interactive Gambling Amendment Bill 2016 requires interactive gambling services to hold a state or territory licence to operate in Australia.

If the bill is passed, a register of licenced gambling services will be published on the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) website to make sure people do not accidently use an illegal offshore site. The bill also strengthens the ability of ACMA to deal with illegal gambling services and bans 'click to call' in-play betting services.

'These services allow consumers to place a large number of bets in a short period of time, which can lead to serious gambling problems,' the Minister for Human Services, the Hon Alan Tudge MP, told the House.

'The combination of clearer legislation, stronger enforcement measures and awareness raising activities will assist in ensuring Australians are protected from illegal gambling services,' the minister said.  The bill is now being considered by the Senate.

Parliament remembers Black Tuesday bushfires

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

'Among Australia's worst' and 'the state's deadliest' is how the Member for Denison, Mr Andrew Wilkie MP, described the Black Tuesday Bushfires.

He was speaking in the House of Representatives on the 50th anniversary of the fires, 110 of which burnt throughout large parts of southern Tasmania in 1967. Sixty-four people died and 900 were injured in the fires, which destroyed about 1500 homes and other buildings, as well as 62 000 livestock.

Remembering the people who lost their lives and the thousands of families affected by the fires, Mr Wilkie said 'We have deep respect for what they endured and thank the survivors for how they rebuilt their lives and laid the foundation of today's Tasmania'.

These sentiments were echoed by the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP. Referring to the resilience of the Tasmanian people, Mr Turnbull said 'We remember all those who helped in those difficult and dangerous times' and thanked the firefighters, other emergency personnel and volunteers 'who courageously put their own lives at risk.'

The Senate also passed a motion to mark the Black Tuesday fires, recognising 'the great trauma experienced by Tasmanians' and 'the tremendous effort by emergency services during the fires and by all Australians' in rebuilding Tasmania.

Character test for migration

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

A bill setting out conditions needing to be met in order to migrate to Australia was passed by the Senate. The Migration Amendment (Character Cancellation Consequential Provisions) Bill 2016 ensures certain visa cancellation powers the government already has are covered by the Migration Act 1958.

Under the bill, a non-citizen who has their application for a visa cancelled on the basis of a character test may be removed from Australia if they do not seek a reversal of the decision in time or are unsuccessful in their appeal. 

The bill was passed by the House of Representatives last year. The Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the Hon Peter Dutton MP, said it demonstrated the ‘government's clear and continuing commitment to ensuring that non-citizens who pose a risk to the Australian community are dealt with effectively, efficiently and comprehensively.’

Bill to protect Indigenous culture

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Most Aboriginal souvenirs sold in Australia are made overseas, the Hon Bob Katter MP told the House of Representatives. Mr Katter, together with Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP, has introduced a private bill to put a stop to this.

The Competition and Consumer Amendment (Exploitation of Indigenous Culture) Bill 2017 will amend, or change, the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 'to prevent non-First Australians and foreigners from benefitting from the sale of Indigenous art, souvenir items and other cultural affirmations'.

Under the bill, it will be an offence to sell, or try to sell, anything that is an 'Indigenous cultural expression', unless there is an arrangement in place with an Indigenous community or artist to do so.

In introducing the bill, Mr Katter confirmed that a survey of Cairns souvenir shops showed 'over 95 per cent of the supposed Aboriginal souvenirs were not Aboriginal at all; they were from overseas.' Mr Katter added 'the vast bulk... of the stuff being sold is rubbish which our First Australians get nothing out of.'

Committee reports on same-sex marriage bill

Sitting period 7 to 16 February

Committee reports on same-sex marriage bill

Any future legislation, or law, to change the Marriage Act 1961 to allow same-sex marriage should make sure religious freedoms are protected. This was one of the findings of the Select Committee on the Exposure Draft of the Marriage Amendment (Same-Sex Marriage) Bill.

This bill was part of the government’s preparation for a proposed plebiscite, or vote of the people, on the issue of same-sex marriage. Although the plebiscite did not go ahead, the committee continued its inquiry, believing the findings could help inform future debate on the issue.

As part of the wide-ranging inquiry, the committee recommended that ministers of religion or religious celebrants be exempt from performing same-sex marriage ceremonies if it is not in line with their beliefs. In addition, the committee recommended the use of the expression ‘two people’, so as not to exclude anyone in the definition of those who could marry.

In introducing the report, Committee Chair Senator David Fawcett, said ‘this is an important piece of work because, if the parliament ever chooses to go down the path of changing, this is the scope of issues that we will need to carefully consider in order to keep Australia a diverse and plural society.’

Ministry reshuffle sees appointment of first Indigenous minister

1 February 2017

Ahead of Parliament resuming for 2017, the Prime Minister, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP, announced a minor reshuffle of the federal ministry.

Under the changes, the Hon Ken Wyatt, the Member for Hasluck, was appointed Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health. In 2010 Mr Wyatt became the first Indigenous Australian elected to the House of Representatives, and his new appointment makes him the first Indigenous person to serve in the ministry.

The Hon Greg Hunt, the Member for Flinders, was appointed the new Minister for Health and Minister for Sport. New South Wales Senator, the Hon Arthur Sinodinos, will take over Mr Hunt’s previous portfolios, becoming the Minister for the Environment, and Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science. The Hon Michael Sukkar, the Member for Deakin, is now Assistant Minister to the Treasurer.

Announcing the reshuffle, Mr Turnbull said ‘These changes will further strengthen my Ministry by combining experience and new talent. It’s a team that’s focused on delivering for all Australians.’

Parliament will resume sitting on 7 February after a summer recess.

More information

2017 parliamentary sitting dates published

20 January 2017

The 45th Parliament will resume for 2017 on Tuesday 7 February, with both the House of Representatives and the Senate sitting for a two-week period.

The 2017 Sitting Calendar was agreed to by both houses last November.

In addition to showing when each house will sit, the 2017 Sitting Calendar includes dates for the federal Budget and Senate Estimates hearings

The year in numbers

15 December 2016

An early Budget, a double dissolution election and the proroguing of the Parliament contributed to making 2016 a busy year for the Parliament. The Budget was brought forward by a week so an  election could be held in July.

On top of this, the House of Representatives passed 123 bills – 60 to date in the 45th Parliament – sat for 51 days and over 500 hours. The Senate, meanwhile, sat for 42 days, or a total of 457 hours and 40 minutes, with an average sitting day of nearly 11 hours. It passed 79 bills in 2016.

During Question Time, 945 questions were asked in the House, and 1498 in the Senate including supplementary, or follow-up, questions. Twenty-two petitions were presented to the Senate with a total of 133 259 signatures, and 101 petitions were presented to the House with 228 532 signatures.

In 2016 over 300 committee reports – from Senate, House of Representatives and joint committees – were presented to the Parliament. In particular, Senate committees conducted 488 hours and seven minutes of Estimates hearings, in which senators questioned ministers and senior public servants about government decisions and spending.

Since the 45th Parliament commenced on 30 August, 48 bills have been passed by both Houses. In the Senate, 487 amendments, or changes, to bills have been moved, of which 263 have been agreed to.

The figures in the 2016 statistics were lower than previous years because the Parliament did not meet over the election period.

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Many firsts in 2016 Parliament

15 December 2016

Fifty-three new members of parliament were elected at the 2 July election, including 39 in the House and 14 senators. The double dissolution election delivered a crossbench of 20 in the Senate – the largest since federation in 1901 – and saw the first member of the Nick Xenophon Team, Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP, elected to the House of Representatives.

The first Indigenous Australian woman, the Hon Linda Burney MP, and the first Muslim woman, Dr Anne Aly MP, were also elected to the House. Following the election, the number of women in the Senate and House of Representatives rose to 73 (32 per cent), up from 69 (31 per cent) in the 44th Parliament.

For the first time at the start of a new Parliament, all the larger parties have a female deputy leader. They include the Hon Julie Bishop MP from the Liberal Party of Australia, the Hon Tanya Plibersek MP from the Australian Labor Party, Senator the Hon Fiona Nash from The Nationals and Australian Greens co-deputy leader Senator Larissa Waters.

At 28 years of age, Senator James Paterson became the youngest person then in the Senate when he filled a casual vacancy for Victoria in March 2016.

The Senate sat through the night in March to consider a list of bills, including the Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016. At 28 hours and 56 minutes, it is thought to be the longest continuous sitting of the Senate.

In another first for the Parliament, the House of Representatives voted to change the standing orders, or rules, of the House to allow members to breastfeed or bottle-feed their babies in the chamber.  The Senate also agreed senators could bring infants in their care into the chamber for brief periods. This would be at the discretion of the President of the Senate and as long as it did not disrupt the business of the chamber.